21st-century latin literature?

By interprete, in 'General Latin Chat (English)', Jan 1, 2013.

  1. Kosmokrator Active Member

    Location:
    Pléroma
    nice point of view; it's not mine though
  2. Nikolaos schmikolaos

    • Censor
    Kosmo's works are a little different from a full-blown book. I wouldn't mind writing the occasional poem and perhaps a jocular manual or two, but something on the scale of The Hobbit requires a remarkable degree of inspiration, effort, and especially time that I would hate to see wasted.

    Poetry in particular, I think, is a special case. An idea that works in Latin may not work well in English.
    Arca Defectionis likes this.
  3. Kosmokrator Active Member

    Location:
    Pléroma
    you'll never know if you can write "the hobbit" unless you try

    i think it's rather the opposite
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    No, I think it's both. Something that works in Latin may not work in English, and something that works in English may not work in Latin. As well as something that works in Chinese may not work in Arabic or something that works in Indonesian may not work in Hebrew or wathever.
    Gregorius Textor likes this.
  5. Nikolaos schmikolaos

    • Censor
    I actually was thinking in terms of meter and poeticness, if I may invent a word. Sometimes just the sound of two words together can be enough to inspire some simple couplet, and that couplet might inspire an entire poem. The English translation probably won't sound as good as the Latin.
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Of course. This was included in my thought when I wrote my post. This "sound of two words together" can happen in any language. And whatever language it happens in, it's untranslatable in any other one.
  7. interprete Member

    Try and translate that : "je suis l'as de trèfle qui pique ton coeur, carreau... Caroline" (a song by MC Solaar, si ça te dit quelque chose Pacis Puella ;))
  8. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Bien sûr ça me dit quelque chose! Et ces jeux de mots sont bien sûr complètement intraduisibles. :)
  9. Matthaeus Vemortuicida strenuus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Varsovia
    Both Kosmokrator and I have already kinda contributed to a brand-new genre: 21-st century Latin zombie literature, something George Romero never even dreamt of...
    Kosmokrator likes this.
  10. Stultus Jacobus Member

    this sounds amazing
  11. Matthaeus Vemortuicida strenuus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Varsovia
    I know, right?
  12. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    It is! Please see here the famous De Vemortuorum Rebus Scitu Dignissimis Liber, "The Book on the Things Most Worthy to be Known about the Undead", which I'm doing my best to translate to English.
    Kosmokrator and Stultus Jacobus like this.
  13. Symposion Member

    Location:
    Helsingia (Finnia)
    Here in Finland there is once a week a short radio news program totally in Latin. It is called Nuntii Latini. http://yle.fi/radio1/tiede/nuntii_latini/ The Catholic Church do also produce texts in Latin. There is also the Pontifical Academy for Latin (Pontificia Academia Latinitatis) inventing and keeping up the Latin language.
  14. Acsacal Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Ile-de-France
    There is Ephemeris too, a news site in Latin.
  15. Schatzl Active Member

    Location:
    USA
    Some parts of Wikipedia in Latin. I know it's not the most credible source but it's...something.
  16. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Kosmokrator likes this.
  17. Erica Swanson New Member

    This is an old discussion but, for those who have not yet discovered him, Stephanus Berard is writing modern novels in Latin. Please check out his website, boreoccidentales.com, for book summaries and reviews. His second novel should be published in 2016.
    Callaina likes this.
  18. Tom Cotton New Member

    I am one of those modern translators-into-Latin, who found this site only very recently. As you may imagine, I found this thread especiallyinteresting.

    People have their own, perhaps very different, reasons for undertaking these translations: I usually include some explanation of my approach to the particular work. This is the beginning of my introduction to my most recent one, Superbia et Odium (Pride & Prejudice), published last February:

    "This is the fifth in a series of well-known English works translated into Latin. Even in the opinion of that tiny minority of my family and friends who have not been completely indifferent to the previous four, I have a hobby which is either bizarre, or (on a good day) worthy of admiration — if only for the effort entailed. I can only reply that, bizarrely or not, I do it all for pleasure. . . . . "

    "Pleasure" just about sums it up. The sales are gratifying, but not spectacular, and I could never make a living from them; but correspondence with readers over 35 years has encouraged me to continue.

    Tom Cotton.
    Gregorius Textor and Aurifex like this.
  19. Gregorius Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    The prospect of this thread is exciting, all the more so because there are apparently a few corners of the modern literary spheres where original works have already been penned in Latin!

    The topic of finding (or coining) Latin words for distinctly modern objects and concepts came up, and this is a particularly favorite topic of mine. Would anyone like to try a quick experiment by seeing how well they can decode the following sentences using neologisms (or new usages of attested Latin words)?

    Cur non me amicabis in Libro Facierum?

    Gelata valde bonum est, sed mihi optimum cinematographum disneianum est Pulchra Bestiaque.

    Ieffrius Foxvorthius dixit, "Si ter matrimonio iunctus es et tamen eandem socrum habes, fortasse rusticissimus es!" (if we want to be especially creative, we might even invent rubricollus in place of rusticissimus)

    Telora Suifta est cantrix musicae ruralis quae maxime mihi placet.

    In Interrete mihi placet intueri feles ridendos!

    Vidistine novum cinematographum de Superviro Vir Aceri?
  20. Tom Cotton New Member

    It can be quite tricky to adapt (or even adopt) words to classical forms.

    Nonne Facielibro mihi amicabis?
    Gelata bene, sed cinematographum disneianum Pulchra Bestiaque magis delectat.
    rubecollus (rubeus = red, ruddy)
    Vestifica Celer apud me optissima carminum rusticorum cantatrix.
    Vir aceri? Why, is he Canadian? (acer, aceris = maple)

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