Aeneid - Book V

By AoM, in 'Aeneid', Sep 24, 2017.

  1. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    A&G uses the term "cognate" accusative even with non-cognates, saying something like "the cognate accusative is often used loosely by the poets".

    So according to A&G, servitutem servire, saltare Cyclopa, herbam mella sapiunt, pingue quiddam atque peregrinum sonantibus, plurimum posse, and intonuit laevum are all cognate accusative.

    But they also provide the alternate term "accusative of kindred signification" which is basically the term in AoM's commentary.
    Bitmap likes this.
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Mirum.
    Bitmap and Dantius like this.
  3. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Yes, it's one of the weirder things in A&G in my experience.
  4. AoM nulli numeri

    • Civis Illustris
    Btw, the phrase was:

    ille inter navemque Gyae scopulosque sonantis
    radit iter laevum interior subitoque priorem
    praeterit et metis tenet aequora tuta relictis.
  5. AoM nulli numeri

    • Civis Illustris
    Learned a new word: "metempsychosis"
  6. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Where would that come up in Book V?
  7. AoM nulli numeri

    • Civis Illustris
    "liquentia: Forms of this verb occur 5× in the A.; besides here and the related 776 below, note 1.432, of honey; 6.724 camposque liquentis, at the outset of Anchises’ great discourse on metempsychosis; 9.679 liquentia flumina."
  8. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    I suspected it would have to do with book 6 which is why I was confused at it being in a book 5 commentary. I'm not entirely certain what the point of that note is, really.
  9. AoM nulli numeri

    • Civis Illustris
    Heh. Remember what I was saying about padding. They love their parallels.

    Take a look at this behemoth:

    "tum vero: Elsewhere in V. at E. 6.27–28 tum vero in numerum Faunosque ferasque / ludere; G. 3.505–506 tum vero ardentes oculi atque attractus ab alto / spiritus; in the A. the phrase is usually associated with moments of high drama, indeed some of the darkest in the epic: 1.485 tum vero ingentem gemitum dat pectore ab imo (Aeneas’ reaction to the pictures in Dido’s temple); 2.105 tum vero ardemus scitari et quaerere causas (the Trojans with Sinon); 2.228–229 tum vero tremefacta novus per pectora cunctis / insinuat pavor (the prelude to Laocoön’s death); 2.309–310 tum vero manifesta fides, Danaumque patescunt / insidiae; 2.624–625 tum vero omne mihi visum considere in ignis / Ilium et ex imo verti Neptunia Troia; 3.47 tum vero ancipiti mentem formidine pressus (of the omen at Polydorus’ grave); 4.397 tum vero infelix fatis exterrita Dido; 4.450 tum vero Aeneas subitis exterritus umbris; 5.227, 659 and 720 below; 7.376 tum vero infelix ingentibus excita monstris (of Amata); 7.519–520 tum vero ad vocem celeres, qua bucina signa / dira dedit (of the start of the war in Latium); 9.73 tum vero incumbunt (urget praesentia Turni)—during the attempted burning of the ships; 9.424 ibat in Euryalum. tum vero exterritus, amens (Nisus’ reaction to the attack on his lover); 10.647–648 tum vero Aenean aversum et cedere Turnus / credidit (the apparition of the phantom Aeneas); 11.633 tum vero et gemitus morientum et sanguine in alto; 11.832–833 tum vero immensus surgens ferit aurea clamor / sidera; 12.257 tum vero augurium Rutuli clamore salutant; 12.494–495 tum vero adsurgunt irae, insidiisque subactus (of Aeneas); 12.756 tum vero exoritur clamor ripaeque lacusque / responsant circa et caelum tonat omne tumultu; 12.776 tum vero amens formidine Turnus. Cf. Lucretius, DRN 6.1153 omnia tum vero vitai claustra lababant, during the description of the plague at Athens; Propertius, c. 2.1.14 tum vero longas condimus Iliadas. Once again, V. imports dramatic resonance to the seemingly more relaxed world of the games; the language is an integral element of the transformation of the contests into a microcosm of the epic."
  10. AoM nulli numeri

    • Civis Illustris
    I should've caught this parallel earlier, but it's a great one.

    Ancestor and descendant experiencing a similar misery.

    et primum in scopulo luctantem deserit alto
    Sergestum (5.220-1)

    et scelerum poenas, et te, Catilina, minaci
    pendentem scopulo (8.668-9)
  11. AoM nulli numeri

    • Civis Illustris
    I'd never seen this sculpture before. I guess that's a spearhead in Nisus' chest?

  12. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    Or a sword?

    Shouldn't that go in book 9? :p
  13. AoM nulli numeri

    • Civis Illustris
    Probably.

    Just posted it here because it was mentioned in the 5 commentary, now that they're at the foot race.
  14. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Is that a classical sculpture or modern?
  15. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    1830ish
  16. AoM nulli numeri

    • Civis Illustris
    They gave an article that had some artistic representations of Dares vs. Entellus.

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    Also, this got a good laugh out of me.

    [IMG]
    Pacifica likes this.
  17. [IMG]
  18. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Odd. They're in Arabic order.
    Bitmap likes this.
  19. AoM nulli numeri

    • Civis Illustris
    "Amycus was a son of Poseidon, who was noted for forcing those strangers who traversed his kingdom to box with him (to their deaths)..."

    Well, that's an interesting custom.
  20. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Reminds me a bit of Antaeus.
    AoM likes this.

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