"Always moving forward, without fear"

By Neil H, in 'English to Latin Translation', Jul 26, 2013.

  1. Neil H New Member

    Hello,

    I've be inspired recently to come up with a family/personal motto. I've considered using "Semper anticus, sine metu" But as I looked into "anticus," I've discovered it may not be exactly what I'm looking for. I could be absolutely wrong about this, but anticus means more being in front or first in line, right? Where I want it to be "moving forward" or "proceeding."

    So, "Always moving forward, without fear," or similar.

    Thank you in advance for your help.
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Hello,

    Indeed anticus doesn't mean what you want.

    But I need to know a few things: is "moving forward" meant to describe someone, like an adjective, someone always moving forward? And if yes, should it describe one person or several (maybe all your family)?

    Or is it not to describe someone but more like some sort of command like "one should always move forward", or "the important is always to move forward"...? Or closer to a simple infinitive "to move forward"?

    The thing is that the English present participle doesn't have a 100% exact equivalent in Latin which would be the same in all contexts; it will translate differently in different contexts.
  3. Neil H New Member

    Thank you for your quick response.

    More like a command. As if I were to tell my son, always move forward. So I think more closer to your "the important is always to move forward."
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I'd say this:

    Semper pergendum sine timore: closest possible back-translation into English still looking like English: one should always go forward without fear.

    The form of the verb used there, pergendum, is indicating that the action of "moving forward" is something that has to be done, must be done. It's not ordering someone personally and directly like an imperative "you, go forward" would do; it's just stating that it's a thing that has to be done. Now if you say that to your son, it of course implies you want him to do it. :)

    Sine timore is literally "without fear", but in the same sense you could also say intrepide, "fearlessly".
  5. Ignis Umbra Ignis Aeternus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    USA
    Hello, I'd like to offer my own translation:

    Semper procedendum sine timore - Always moving forward without fear
  6. Neil H New Member

    That's perfect! You put my thoughts into words perfectly, thank you. What was my mistake with sine metu?

    Can you help me with the pronunciation of, Semper pergendum sine timore? Please forgive my ignorance.
  7. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Actually, none, it's also correct for "without fear" - it just uses another word meaning "fear" too. I had overlooked it, sorry.

    For the pronunciation, I think our professional super-recording-man Godmy will make a recording for you when he has time. Unless Matthaeus comes by here first.
  8. Neil H New Member

    This forum is great, seems like a well oiled machine. Thank you for your help, should I anticipate Godmy or Matthaeus to respond here or should I reach out to them?

    Continuing curiosity begs me to ask, is there no difference between timore and metu then? Is either one more grammatically correct?
  9. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    Oh, thank you :p

    My voice should be now alright after the concert xD (after which strain I was quite unable to speak :cool: ) ).

    _________________________

    Try to pronounce it exactly the same as in this recording, Neil H, as me. The "r", the "vowels" the accent/stress... everything. Imitate.

    Attached Files:

  10. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    They will respond here. Their names in brownish/orange in my post means that I "tagged" them, they will receive an alert telling them I called them here.
    Both are correct. Both mean "fear"; if there is a difference in meaning it must be some slight nuance and I'd be hard put to it to tell you exactly what it is...

    Edit: Thanks, Godmy, as always!
  11. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    :)
    And here something for fun... (don't listen to this recording Neil H and definitely do not imitate it! Listen to the previous one. :p)

    Attached Files:

    Pacis puella likes this.
  12. Neil H New Member

    Goodness, you guys are amazing.
  13. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    The latter was an attempt for the 'abolished' English traditional pronunciation.. :p

    I also thought I could try something as "French traditional (maybe abolished) pronunciation", but Pacis puella would surely kill me!

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by Godmy, Jul 26, 2013
    Pacis puella likes this.
  14. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    Nevertheless, if you are satisfied, Neil H, you could consider a donation to our server :) (even 5 USD will do). We are still having hard times and the expenses are not the lowest possible. But that's of course wholly up to you (we never force anybody to donate).
  15. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    This dictionary gives pretty much the same definitions for timor and metus (there's one letter different in each one from timore and metu only because because timor and metus are the nominative, "basic" forms if you will of timore and metu, are in ablative, the form you need in your phrase).

    Now here are the definitions my own dic gives:

    Timor:
    1) A feeling of being afraid, fear.
    2) An object or source of fear. b. a person on whose behalf one fears, an object of anxiety.
    3) Fear personified.

    Metus:
    1) Fear (of what may happen), alarm, apprehension. b. an instance of this emotion.
    2) Anxiety for the safety (of), fear (of).
    3) Fear, dread (of a person or thing regarded as a source of danger). b. (in good sense) awe, veneration (with person specified).
    4) A ground for alarm, risk, threat. b. an object of dread.

    But only the first definition of each apply in this case, as the source of fear isn't stated. They can be called synonymous.
  16. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    No. :D
  17. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    I sometimes mix it a bit with German xD But as I you see I already uploaded it, hehehhe :browaction1:
  18. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Yes, I've just seen that! Actually I somehow hadn't realized there were two posts, so I had only listened to the English one (and coming back I thought you had edited the same post), thinking you were just planning to make the French one if I promised I wouldn't kill you, lol. :D
  19. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    And now, wil you kill me? :akimbo:
  20. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    No, I told you. ;)

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