Anthousai

By Darklander, in 'Ancient Greek', Feb 9, 2018.

  1. Darklander Member

    I understand that the above word is Greek and not Latin, however I am trying to find what the correct singular form of the word: "Anthousai"

    I have tried using wiktionary but to no avail.
  2. R. Seltza Member

    Location:
    Nebula Septima
    I don't think there's a direct translation for this, but the closest thing I guess would be Flos Nympha.

    However, This may not be entirely accurate because Nympha is grammatically not an adjective.
    Even though an "Anthousai" is a Female Flower Nymph, I don't think there's a feminine version of the word Flos,
    So this is definitely tricky to translate...
  3. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    I don't think they're asking for a Latin translation anyway, just the singular form of the Greek word.
  4. Darklander Member

    Dantius is correct, I am mainly looking for the correct singular form of the Greek word: Anthousai. I do apologize if I posted my thread in the wrong forum as it has been quite a while since my last post.
  5. Bestiola Speculatrix

    • Praetor
    • Praeco
    No problem, I've moved it to the Ancient Greek subforum.
  6. Darklander Member

    Do you happen to know what the correct Greek singular would be for Anthousai, Bestiola?
  7. Bestiola Speculatrix

    • Praetor
    • Praeco
    Could I please ask where did you find that word? I've found one slightly dubious site which claims it's singular form is "Anthousa": http://greekmythology.wikia.com/wiki/Category:Anthousa

    This looks more promising:
    https://books.google.hr/books?id=qD...6AEIMjAC#v=onepage&q=anthos, anthousa&f=false

    But I hope someone more versed in Greek will jump in since I'm a Latin student, and Greek is too Greek for me.
  8. Darklander Member

    I found it on Wikipedia as the collective noun for flower nymphs and I believe the same word is used in my other mythological creatures books.

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