1. Hadassah Branch Member

    Location:
    Grove of Dodona
    Do you guys know how Latin examinations, like AP and SAT Latin, work? I never took these and wonder what minimum level would be needed for takers of these exams to be guaranteed a pass.
  2. Ronolio New Member

    I don't know about the SAT, but the AP Latin is basically material presented in 3rd and 4th term college level Latin Classes (De Bello Gallico and Aeneid). There are numerous online resources for the AP material. Geoffrey Steadman has a particularly good Caesar text. https://geoffreysteadman.com/
    Hadassah Branch likes this.
  3. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    The SAT subject test for Latin consists of various sections of increasing difficulty. The first couple parts are super easy (questions like "What is the accusative singular of casus?" Then I think there's some etymology questions. The last two or three parts are reading comprehension and they are a significant jump up in difficulty from the previous sections.

    I know one of last year's passages, because a friend of mine asked me about it immediately after the exam while my memory was still fresh, so I was able to make a document with the passage. I'll post it here.
    Cum Phōciōn saepe exercitibus praefuisset summōsque magistrātūs cēpisset, tamen multō ēius nōtior erat integritās vītae quam reī mīlitāris labor. Itaque cognōmine Bonus est appellātus. Fuit enim perpetuō pauper, cum dīvitissimus esse posset propter honōrēs potestātēsque summās, quae eī ā populō dabantur. Hic cum ā rēge Philippō mūnera magnae pecūniae repudiāret lēgātīque hortārentur accipere simulque admonērent, sī ipse hīs facile carēret, līberīs tamen suīs prōspiceret, ille 'Sī mihī similēs erunt' inquit 'agellus illōs alet; sī dissimilēs sunt futūrī, nōlō meīs impēnsīs alī illōrum augērīque luxuriam.'
    Some words were glossed, such as agellus.

    The questions for the reading comprehension passages were very similar to those asked on the AP Latin exam, i.e. some grammar questions (case uses, types of clauses, antecedents of relative clauses, etc.), some comprehension. I believe the poetry passage may have asked a scansion question.
    Hadassah Branch likes this.
  4. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses/ap-latin/exam?course=ap-latin

    Here's some info about the AP Latin exam, as well as links to past free response questions. The multiple choice questions are not available here. Generally the College Board likes to keep the multiple choice questions secure so that teachers can use them in class, though sometimes they release one or two years' MC questions publicly as a sample test. I don't know if they've done that with AP Latin.
  5. Hadassah Branch Member

    Location:
    Grove of Dodona
    That's interesting. Could you take the AP Latin exam even if you have never took the course? Or even so, would it be advisable?
  6. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Yes, as I am going to do in May.

    But, I've taken Latin in a previous year from a teacher who teaches in a way that's very similar to/geared towards the AP Latin exam, so I know all their peculiarities, what kinds of questions they ask, how they want certain things to be answered, etc. They have particular definitions for case uses that aren't necessarily shared by everyone, so it would be good to know such things.
  7. Hadassah Branch Member

    Location:
    Grove of Dodona
    How many years of Latin have you had? If you don't mind, could you share what kind of definitions those would be? Or is that beyond your jurisdiction?

    It seems like you're applying for colleges soon. If so, good luck!
  8. Ronolio New Member

    I would definitely recommend the Bolchazy Carducci Press Caesar Workbook and the Virgil Workbook. Both have questions focusing on the AP passages modeled on what appears on the tests. They have multiple choice, short answer, essay and translation sections for each selection and are broken into roughly 35 sections for each, so manageable segments. You can find the workbooks used for a relatively low price. The teacher editions are also available, but those are more costly.
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