1. Pendraconginae New Member

    I'm looking for a translation that resembles the statement as an initiation. A trial. Metaphorically, or not; it is intended to be ... overzealous in tribulations. It would also be helpful, for a translation of "Crucible of Souls." An enduring experience, too. If you have any more questions, please ask I will answer as best as I can. Thank you, it is deeply appreciated that every member reads these; it helps with writing of my novel.
  2. Araneus Umbraticus Lector

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Norvegia
    So "Baptism of fire" is a metaphor signifying that someone is baptised with fire instead of water? And "crucible" is meant here in the sense of "test"/"trial"? Do "souls" refer to the souls of deceased people? Is "Crucible of souls" something like purgatory?
    Pendraconginae likes this.
  3. Pendraconginae New Member

    Yes, that would be correct; I imagine. I'm shooting for bathed in fire, as one is bathed in water. Crucible is meant to he a trial!~ As for the soul, I would argue something along the lines: that the soul is not a deeper part of one’s self, but is the self -- not a deceased individual. And purgatory would be a perfect example.
  4. Araneus Umbraticus Lector

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Norvegia
    Ok, I see. My suggestions then would be Baptisma igneum (Igneum being an adjective here, so literally "Fire baptism"/"Fiery baptism") and Tribulatio animarum. Animarum here, a form of anima, refers to the life force in any living being, and can be used with reference to both living people and the souls/shades of the dead in the underworld or wherever.

    You may want to wait around and see what others think of this. Others might have better suggestions than me.
  5. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    If "baptism of fire" is used as the idiom here, rather than meaning a religious baptism, baptisma igneum probably won't work.
  6. Araneus Umbraticus Lector

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Norvegia
    I didn't consider that really. If Pendraconginae would explain the context in which it is to be used a bit more, perhaps we could find a phrase that may convey a similar meaning without being a more or less direct translation of the idiom.
  7. Pendraconginae New Member

    The idiom Pacifica generously provided, is more what I am aiming for. Perhaps, bathed into a new life? As if a human were born into that of a Dragon?
  8. AoM Rosa Caerula

    • Civis Illustris
  9. Adrian Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    My first guess was ritus igni, but perhaps something along the lines of
    ritus/mos extrema (adversa) perferendi
    ritus / mos extremorum (adversorum) perferendorum
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  10. Pendraconginae New Member

    Would the adversa/adversorum be optional?
  11. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    They're options.

    ritus/mos extrema perferendi
    ritus/mos extremorum perferendorum

    =

    "the custom of enduring extreme/desperate situations"

    ritus/mos adversa perferendi
    ritus/mos adversorum perferendorum

    =

    "the custom of enduring adversity/hardships"

    The versions with perferendi are probably better.

    I don't know if the idea is close enough to that of a "baptism of fire". To me at any rate, it seems rather different.
    Pendraconginae likes this.
  12. Pendraconginae New Member

    I am grateful for all the renditions that you've all come up with; I apologize that I lack in an explanation. Perhaps, as if it were someone bathed in fire.
  13. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    I would definitely agree with that. I've read in a number of places that the Romans hated two -orum endings in a row, and that's one of the most common circumstances where they would use a gerund instead of a gerundive. I think neuter pronouns/neuter substantive adjectives is another common reason for using a gerund, which also applies here.

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