Benefits of Studying Latin

By Akela, in 'General Latin Chat (English)', Jul 21, 2010.

  1. The Kenosha Kid Active Member

    Location:
    The Zone
    Or perhaps 'demurs'.
  2. Aurifex Aedilis

    • Aedilis
    Location:
    England
    My understanding was that this transitive meaning was now obsolete.
    tim05000 and The Kenosha Kid like this.
  3. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    I can't say I've heard it in the past several hundred years, but reviving old usages may be a pet project of some, and not necessarily one doomed to failure in all instances.
  4. Imperfacundus Reprobatissimus

    • Civis Illustris
    More proof, as if any were needed, of etaoin's immortality.
    The Kenosha Kid likes this.
  5. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    There's a theory that prayers are more effective in Latin because the devil doesn't like the sound of it.
    Dantius likes this.
  6. Alphege New Member

    Location:
    Ohio
    Yes, the devil may hate the sound of Latin.
  7. Aurifex Aedilis

    • Aedilis
    Location:
    England
    Odd then that he speaks it in The Exorcist and Father Karras exorcises using English.
  8. Iohannes Aurum Technicus Auxiliarius

    • Technicus Auxiliarius
    Cinefactus likes this.
  9. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    ROFL :)
  10. Terry S. flamen

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Hibernia

    I think Father Karras' attempts in English are a bit of poetic licence on the part of the author/director. The English translation of the Rite of Exorcism didn't exist at that time. It was the last of the rites to be revised following Vatican II, and the approved English translation is very recent.
  11. Aurifex Aedilis

    • Aedilis
    Location:
    England
    You'd think the director might have wanted to have the priest say the exorcism in Latin rather than English to suggest his authority over the demon. But maybe the director wasn't too hot at Latin at school or something, and he wanted to tell everyone what a diabolical language he thought it was.
    Callaina likes this.
  12. Terry S. flamen

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Hibernia
    Well, Father Karras was a 1970s Jesuit. It was in keeping with his character that he be ignorant of all things Latin.
    Aurifex likes this.
  13. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Latin seemed generally in decline in the '70s, and probably before that. My own school dropped both it and German from foreign languages, for example.
  14. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    LOL.

    Terry S., what are your thoughts (being a Catholic) on the effectiveness of prayers in Latin versus English (or other vernaculars)?
  15. Terry S. flamen

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Hibernia

    Definitely. Plus, the Jesuits after the Council went stark raving mad over all things new, polyester and goofy. They couldn't have denied their heritage any harder, and especially the Latin bit of the Latin Church.

    On the secular side, wherever Latin was dropped as a University entrance requirement, its demise in schools followed hot on its heels.
  16. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    In the States Latin never was a university entrance requirement at most if not all institutions, but even modern foreign languages are comparatively rarely specified by individual colleges for entrance or graduation. And most of the teaching is exceptionally ineffective, whether at school or higher level.
  17. Terry S. flamen

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Hibernia

    The language doesn't make any difference to efficacy. Public prayer in Latin provides all sorts of social benefits in terms of unity in a diverse Church. It also guarantees, in the case of sacraments and sacramentals, that a valid form of the prayer is being used as opposed to a defective translation. These are not unknown unfortunately. Lastly, Latin (in most cases) stops idiot clergy ad libbing and afflicting the People of God with their impromptu ravings and cravings.
  18. Terry S. flamen

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Hibernia

    That is something I didn't know. I would have thought it would be otherwise given the early dates of the founding of some of those universities.
  19. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    I was hoping I'd get away with a sweeping statement. I think Harvard did have such a requirement at one point, and perhaps other early institutions, but I'm not sure when they abandoned it. I suppose I'm thinking more of the 20th century, and in particular the second half, when it simply wouldn't have been possible to take Latin at many otherwise good schools that dispatched pretty much their entire output to so-called good universities.
  20. Cassia New Member

    It doesn't just expand one's vocabulary; it makes English words much more meaningful. For example, knowing that the name "Lucifer" means "Bearer of Light," or that piety comes from pietas, which encompasses the hierarchy of duty: gods, country, family, and self. Some of the many derivatives, I think, have become somewhat watered down with our everyday usage, but knowing their original meaning makes them much more vivid.

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