Can someone give me sentences to translate? I need practice.

By Seamus, in 'General Latin Chat (English)', Sep 30, 2016.

  1. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    Hi, I am in Year 10 and am doing latin, and need more sentences for practice as I've done all in my textbook. The vocab we are using is in a file I've uploaded. Command/Control F may come in handy (I'd appreciate it if you used this, but you can add other words as well).

    First post here, so if this is mean't to be posted somewhere else, please feel free to tell me.

    Thanks, Seamus

    Attached Files:

  2. Laurentius Weebus Maximus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    What should they be about? Something in particular?
  3. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    More importantly, since I don't know what Year 10 means, what level of Latin?
  4. Laurentius Weebus Maximus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    Yes I meant like first declension, ut clauses, etc.
  5. Aurifex Aedilis

    • Aedilis
    Location:
    England
    It means the tenth full year of compulsory education, which begins at 4 or 5 years old. It's not necessarily correlated with any particular level of Latin.
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Seamus, I would be ok to give you a sentence every now and then, but, like the others, I need to know more or less what level you are at. So could you tell me which of the following you have already learned?

    - All declensions and conjugations (if not, tell me which you have learned)

    - All tenses, moods, and voices (if not, tell me which you have: present active indicative, perfect active indicative, imperfect active indicative, pluperfect active indicative, future active indicative, future perfect active indicative, present active subjunctive, perfect active subjunctive, imperfect active subjunctive, pluperfect active subjunctive, present passive indicative, perfect passive indicative, imperfect passive indicative, pluperfect passive indicative, future passive indicative, future perfect passive indicative, present passive subjunctive, perfect passive subjunctive, imperfect passive sibjunctive, pluperfect passive subjunctive, active singular imperative, active plural imperative, passive singular imperative, passive plural imperative)

    - Perfect participle

    - Present participle

    - Present infinitive

    - Perfect infinitive

    - Future infinitive

    - Indirect speech/oratio obliqua/accusative and infinitive

    - Relative clauses

    - Purpose clauses

    - Result clauses

    - Gerund

    - Gerundive

    - Supine

    - Demonstrative pronouns/adjectives

    - Cum clauses (temporal, circumstantial, concessive, and causal)

    - Ablative absolute

    Finally, do you want sentences to translate from English to Latin or from Latin to English, or both?
    Last edited by Pacifica, Sep 30, 2016
  7. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    Being an Australian, I just woke up and I am overwhelmed by the responses.
    For background information, I have been doing latin for nearly 2 years, and (if anyone uses it) am using the OLC book 2. I'll upload my digital copy, along with the first OLC. I am up to chapter 24.

    I'll give you a rundown of what I've learnt (please tell me if you don't know what some of them mean):
    Up to the 4th declension
    All conjugations
    Present tense
    Perfect
    Imperfect
    Pluperfect
    Nominative, Accusative, Dative, Genitive, Ablative
    Irregular verbs (i.e. malo, -ere)
    Numbers (cardinal and ordinal up to 10)
    Time (day, night, month, year)
    Commands (voca, vocate)

    And probably more, I'm still tired.
    Thank's for your help,

    Seamus

    EDIT: Tried to add files, but they are too large. Making mediafire links, will upload soon
    EDIT: https://www.mediafire.com/?j2p4j8j8wdx70d8
    http://www.mediafire.com/file/9eocj82rk34lhsm/OLC #2.pdf
    Last edited by seamus, Sep 30, 2016
  8. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    "malo, -ere" is not a verb, do you mean "malo, malle: to prefer"?

    Thanks though for the information!
  9. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    You will forgive me if I don't read the entire books, but I have read the Latin text of the chapter which you said was the last you studied (chapter 24 of book 2), and from that it would appear that, besides the things you mentioned, you have learned about demonstratives, present participles, relative clauses, present active infinitives, superlatives, comparatives (though apparently not the ablative of comparison) and perhaps the distinction between suus and the genitive of demonstrative pronouns (like eius) to express possession in the third person ("his", etc.), because all those things appear in the text. On the other hand, there isn't any subjunctive verb, so I suppose you haven't been introduced to that yet. So now I have some little idea of the level you should be at and what sorts of sentences I could give you to translate (and my colleagues who perhaps don't have time to read or don't feel like reading any part of your books can get an idea of your level from what I have said in this post, too); thanks.

    Now, you haven't answered this question:
  10. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    English to Latin, but if you like you can slip in a few Latin to English
  11. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Ok. In this thread?
  12. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    Y
    Yes! My bad. I was thinking of sino, -ere as I wrote it, so that's probably why
  13. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    Ok. I'm not sure how else to do it.

    Thanks
  14. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Ok, let's start relatively gently with a short one. Translate:

    "Give (sg.) me the book that's on the table."
  15. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    Da mihi libri quod est in tablinium
  16. Laurentius Weebus Maximus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    Look at the case of book and it's gender and number. I can't find the word tablinium.
  17. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    There's a word tab(u)linum, but it doesn't mean table. It is also in the wrong case.

    Here are the words that need correcting:
    Do you have any idea why?
  18. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    libri - not genitive? maybe acc? that would make it liberum
    quod - Hunc?
    tablinium - use the word mensam instead?

    Full sentence:
    Da mihi liberum hunc est in mensam
  19. Laurentius Weebus Maximus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    "Līber, līberī" means free, and as a substantive it can mean a son. The word for book is "liber, librī".
    You were right in using a relative, but given that the gender of liber is not neuter, you can't use quod.
    Yes mensa, but check the case you are using. Accusative is more used when there is a motion/movement involved.
  20. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    da mihi librum illum est in mensā (abl)

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