Can someone give me sentences to translate? I need practice.

By Seamus, in 'General Latin Chat (English)', Sep 30, 2016.

  1. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    "The academy" and gradibus are now correct; but please read my last post again, because there are some things that I mentioned which you've left uncorrected.
    Componentes doesn't agree with what it should. What do you think "putting" should agree with? Who does it refer to?
    I'm sorry, there's one more mistake here that I forgot to mention in my last post for some reason (though I had seen it): Athenis is in the wrong case.

    Also, do mark Cinefactus's post.
  3. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    si dilgenter studueris, multa disces et valde doctus fies... ego epistolam scribam ad amicum meum qui in Academia scholas habet
    If you study diligently, you will, learn many things and you will become very learned. I will write a letter to my friend who has a school in the academy.

    Standing on the steps of the temple, he caught sight of a great procession, proceeding into the forum
    stans in gradibus templi, conspexit magnum pompam procendentem in forum

    He found father putting together things. He said 'we'll go to the port and look for a ship which will bear you to greece.
    invenit patrem conponentem res. ibimus inquit ad portum et petemus navem quae feret te ad graeciam

    When you will have arrived to athens, hand over this letter to Theomnestus, he will recieve you kindly and look after your studies. The gods will protect you.
    Ubi adveneris athenas trades hanc epistolam theomnesto accipiet te benigne et curabit tua studia. Dei servabunt te.
  4. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
  5. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    This, too:
  6. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia

    si dilgenter studueris, multa disces et valde doctus fies... ego epistolam scribam ad amicum meum qui in Academia scholas habet

    If you study diligently, you will, learn many things and you will become very learned. I will write a letter to my friend who has a school in the academy.

    Standing on the steps of the temple, he caught sight of a great procession, proceeding into the forum
    stans in gradibus templi, conspexit magnam pompam procendentem in forum

    He found father putting together things. He said 'we'll go to the port and look for a ship which will bear you to greece.
    invenit patrem conponentem res. ibimus inquit ad portum et petemus navem quae feret te ad graeciam

    When you will have arrived to athens, hand over this letter to Theomnestus, he will recieve you kindly and look after your studies. The gods will protect you.
    Ubi adveneris athenas trade hanc epistolam theomnesto accipiet te benigne et curabit tua studia. Dei servabunt te.

    Also, in latin, would you say "I am pleased by the cow" or "The cow pleases me"
    ([cum] vacca placeo) or (vacca mihi placet)?
  7. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    "vacca mihi placet".

    Although, "vacca placeo", with or without the "cum", does not mean "I am pleased by the cow". "vacca placeo" would either (depending on whether the "a" in vacca is long) mean "I, a cow, please (someone)", or "I please (someone) by means of a cow".


    Since "placeo" takes the dative, the construction that is equivalent to "I am pleased" is really awkward (it would theoretically be something like "a vacca mihi placetur", but I doubt that's attested anywhere, because it's really weird). So never use this, just say "vacca mihi placet."
  8. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Yep, really weird. I don't think it's attested, either.
  9. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    L+S doesn't give any examples.
  10. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    Would you translate as placenta mihi placet as I am pleased by the cake or The cake pleases me?
  11. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    It's literally "The cake pleases me". In good English you might say "I like the cake".
  12. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    Oh ok.
  13. whizzball1 Member

    Location:
    California
    I'd like to be a part of this; however, I'm accustomed to most, if not all, of Latin grammar at this point. Should I create a new thread?
  14. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    Yes, probably best, since your sentences will be at a higher level than Seamus'.
  15. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    Please continue this :)!
  16. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    "Hannibal's soldiers, who liked elephants (use a construction with "placet"), led 80 big elephants to Zama (Zama, Zamae, f.), near which the Romans had pitched camp."

    (pitch camp: castra ponere)
  17. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    milites hannibalis, quo elephantis placuerunt (who were pleased by the elephants), octoginta magnos elephantos ad zamam duxerunt, prope quos romani castra (I know it's always pl., but is it 2D neuter or 1D fem) ponuerant.
  18. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    No. As I said above, you never say "who were pleased by the elephants".
    And "quo elephantis placuerunt" does not in any way mean "who were pleased by the elephants".

    Review our whole conversation above regarding the use of "placere".

    One little thing is that "Zama", being the name of a city/town, does not take some prepositions:
    Romae: "at Rome", (NOT "in Roma")
    Romam: "to Rome", (NOT "ad Romam")
    Romā: "from Rome", (NOT "ab Roma")
    So Zama is constructed the same way.

    I meant "which" to go with "Zama".
    "castra" is indeed neuter plural, so you have it correct.
    "ponuerant" is not correctly formed. (wrong stem)
  19. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    milites hannibalis, quos elephanti placuerunt, octoginta magnos elephantos zamam duxerunt, prope quam romani castra posuerant.
  20. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    This is still not correct. Placere takes the dative (if it can help, think about it as "to be pleasing to someone").

    Also, it's more likely that they liked elephants habitually, so placuerunt isn't in the most likely tense.

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