Can someone give me sentences to translate? I need practice.

By Seamus, in 'General Latin Chat (English)', Sep 30, 2016.

  1. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    milites hannibalis, quibus elephanti placebant, octoginta magnos elephantos zamam duxerunt, prope quam romani castra posuerant.
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Correct.
  3. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    Thanks. Could I get another one?
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    "I will give you a book that you'll like very much."
  5. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    "I will give you a book that you'll like very much."
    dabo tibi librum qui valde multum placeb(it)is
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Valde multum isn't really normal Latin. Usually, only one of those words would be used.

    As for the person of placeo, what is it that will "be pleasing"?
  7. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    dabo tibi librum qui te plurimum placebit
  8. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I wasn't saying that multum and valde were both wrong and that you had to use a different word; I only meant that you mustn't use them both at the same time. This is not to say that plurimum is wrong; it works too, but is just more emphatic (it's the superlative of multum).

    Te is in the wrong case.
  9. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    "I will give you a book which (the book) will please you very much"
    Doesn't that mean that "you" is accusative?
  10. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    We've already told you that placeo takes the dative. If it can help, think about it as "to be pleasing to someone".

    "You" in the English sentence "the book will please you" is indeed a direct object, but the Latin verb placeo works differently from English "please", in that placeo doesn't take a direct object, but a dative instead.
  11. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    dabo tibi librum qui tibi plurimum placebit
  12. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Good.

    "Two Carthaginian soldiers whose elephants had been wounded* in battle were trying to cure them."

    *Last time I asked you, you told me you hadn't learned the passive voice, so "had been wounded" = sauciati erant.
  13. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I guess I should also give you the translation for "were trying", since it's a deponent verb which uses passive endings: conabantur.
  14. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    How do I translate non-latin names into latin? If I was translating my brothers name, Sebastian, how would I do it?
  15. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Probably "Sebastianus", as something like -ianus is a fairly regular ending for some names.

    However some names that don't fit as well seem to be more variable. For instance, I've seen "Adam" (as in Adam and Eve) treated both as indeclined (nominative Adam, genitive Adam, etc.) or as Adamus, Adami. It really depends on the specific name.
  16. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    Could you use Adam as a 3rd declension noun, and decline it as Adam, adamis? or as a fourth declension noun?
  17. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    There are no 4th declension names. Same with 5th declension.
    I don't think I've ever seen Adam as 3rd declension, but I suppose it's theoretically possible.
  18. Seamus Member

    Location:
    Australia
    I want to practice translating a book, like harry potter, so how would I do that?
  19. AoM nulli numeri

    • Civis Illustris
  20. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Harry Potter would be way above the level you're currently at, in my opinion. Also it would have a lot of modern terminology that is difficult to translate into Latin. So I think overall the exercise would be very frustrating and too difficult to actually help you learn.

Share This Page

 

Our Latin forum is a community for discussion of all topics relating to Latin language, ancient and medieval world.

Latin Boards on this Forum:

English to Latin, Latin to English translation, general Latin language, Latin grammar, Latine loquere, ancient and medieval world links.