Cecoderit, ingredi ac moveri

By Jennifer Jessica, in 'Latin to English Translation', Mar 11, 2013.

  1. Jennifer Jessica New Member

    I'm thinking about this sentence for a tatoo ... But I just want to be sure about what it means. So would you please translate it ?

    Sorry about mistakes, I'm french !
  2. Aurifex Aedilis

    • Aedilis
    Location:
    England
    The first word was presumably intended to be ceciderit. If it were, the three words would still not carry any meaningful message:
    "Suppose him to have fallen. To Enter upon. To be moved."
  3. Jennifer Jessica New Member

    Somebody told me it was something like : Fall, get up and move forward
  4. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    No, it isn't.
  5. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    That would rather be something like: cade, resurge ac perge.
  6. Jennifer Jessica New Member

    Thanks ! I don't want to tatoo a wrong sentence.

    "Cade, resurge ac perge" mean more or less : fall, get up & move forward ??
  7. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Yes.

    Tombe, relève-toi et continue (en avant).
  8. Jennifer Jessica New Member

    Thank you so much !!!

    Are you really sure ? Because as I said, I want to tatoo these sentence so I want to be sure !!
  9. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I'm pretty sure, yes. Now you can still wait for second opinion, as of course one is never too careful for such things. :)
  10. Jennifer Jessica New Member

    Would you please help me with these sentence ? I want to know a traduction, pretty sure, because I want to tatoo it.

    Sorry for mystakes, I'm french and my english is not good enought !!

    I'm thinking about these sentence for a tatoo but I want to be sure of the meaning ... Would you please translate ir for me ? Thank you !!
  11. Aurifex Aedilis

    • Aedilis
    Location:
    England
    Please stop repeatedly posting the same request in new threads. Your question will not get answered any more quickly as a result.
  12. Matthaeus Vemortuicida strenuus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Varsovia
    Bene, iam factumst. Nuntius deletus.
  13. Jennifer Jessica New Member

    I just made a mistake ! As I said I'm french & sometimes I dont' use it properly !! Sorry !! I understand that I don't have to post again & again for having a answer
  14. Jennifer Jessica New Member

    I'm thinking about these sentence for a tatoo but I want to be sure of the meaning ... Would you please translate ir for me ? I did a lot of search but I'm not sure enough of the many for tatoo it !

    I'm french, sorry for mystakes !

    Thank you
  15. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Can someone please confirm my version...? Cade, resurge ac perge. Unless someone thinks there's a better way.
    LCF likes this.
  16. Matthaeus Vemortuicida strenuus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Varsovia
    Sure, that works.
  17. Jennifer Jessica New Member

    Merci beaucoup !! (Some words in french :) )
  18. Matthaeus Vemortuicida strenuus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Varsovia
    Oui, je comprends. De rien!
  19. Will this really work? Commanding a person to fall? It makes sense in English, but in this English, you aren't really telling someone to fall; you're really trying to convey the idea of "although you may fall," get up and move on. It's a concessive use of the imperative; it's not giving a command, since, surely, you aren't really commanding the listener to fall. It probably will work, but I'd like to see a parallel. (You can definitely do that sort of thing with a subjunctive--imperative, I'm not so sure.)

    In any case, there should probably be a conjunction between "cade" and "resurge."
    And I'm not so sure that "ac" (= "as well as" is the right word for "and" here.)

    I might write:
    cum cecideris, resurrecta perge!

    A further fear is that this really means something like, "Die, and coming back to life go on" (Mary's last words to Jesus on Good Friday?) since "cado" is a euphemism for "being slain." Maybe a word from a different semantic family (supplex, vinco, subicio...) is in order.

    So here's my suggestion:
    "cum subiecta sis, tamen resurrecta perge!
  20. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    We can wait for what others think, but I don't think the imperative is an issue.

    Ac indicates some kind of strong link between the two actions, I thought it was fitting here.

    Though cadere indeed can mean "to die", its first meaning nonetheless remains "to fall" - the same as the verb "to fall" in English actually, which can also mean "to die" in some contexts. Cadere is just the best and most accurate way in wich one can translate "to fall".

    Subiecta means "having been subjected" rather than "having fallen".

    Resurgere is intransitive and not deponent, so you can't use the perfect participle like this (what is the passive participle of an intransitive verb, actually? What would it mean? "Having been gotten up?" Passive perfect participles of intransitive verbs are usually only used in impersonal contructions, like itum est and such things.)
    Californiensis likes this.

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