1. Aperture New Member

    Translation needed: "Come at me bro!"

    We are mocking up a family crest featuring a hummingbird. Hummingbirds are known for their territorial behavior and lack of fear in the face of larger birds/animals. They have always been a favorite of mine. We have a photograph of a hummingbird staring directly at the camera with a lot of attitude which we have captioned, "Come at me bro." I think it would be a fitting family motto as we are not serious people, but I don't let others push me around. For anyone who doesn't frequent other parts of the internet, "come at me bro" is a meme.

    With my husband's brief knowledge of Latin from his classics minor, he loosely translated, "come at me bro" to "veni ad me frater."

    Is that accurate? Is there a better way to phrase it to get the intent across? Thank you for your time!
    Last edited by Aperture, Apr 2, 2019

  2. lol, don't worry. Not all of us are removed from the internet.

    Your husband ironically got some things right.
    Veni would be used for a command. And me would be used here.
    I can't find any actual grammatical problems. It doesn't really seem to fit, though.
    I want Pacifica to look at this.
    Last edited by Issacus Divus, Apr 3, 2019
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  3. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    It is grammatically correct but I've got serious doubts whether it can convey the same defiant overtones as the English. Veni ad me, at first sight, sounds like a more neutral "come to me".
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  4. Yea. I propose going with something else. It being grammatically correct is pretty good, but it should reflect the meaning of the original sentence.
    Last edited by Issacus Divus, Apr 3, 2019
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  5. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    My first idea of a possible translation was aggredere, frater, but I wouldn't swear that's necessarily the best option. Maybe there's some equivalent idiomatic expression to be found somewhere... or maybe not and we'll have to content ourselves with an educated guess.
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  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I've just found this Plautus passage with something that might be usable for our purposes:

    Ain vero, verbero? deos esse tui similis putas?
    ego pol te istis tuis pro dictis et male factis, furcifer,
    accipiam; modo sis veni huc: invenies infortunium.

    "Really, you scoundrel? You think the gods are like you? I swear I'll take care of you for your words and bad actions, villain; just come here if you please: you'll find trouble."

    Does anyone happen to remember any other passage(s) containing challenges similar to what we're looking for?
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  7. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Another possibility that came to mind is consere.
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  8. I'm thinking "try", like
    "Me temptare/conare"? Something along those lines?
    Last edited by Issacus Divus, Apr 3, 2019
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  9. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Tempta me may be an option.
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  10. Right.
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  11. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada

    This is quite close to the English "Just try me", which conveys the same defiant attitude.
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  12. Aperture New Member

    So many of these are great. I mostly know Latin that pertains to my Catholic upbringing, but I recognize a lot of these roots and love the mood they set. Aggredere, frater looks cool. I'm leaning towards Tempta me, frater because it has a really nice ring to it. I like the consere option too. I'll run them by the fam to get some opinions.

    The Plautus excerpt is really fun to read. My husband wooed me on one of our first dates in the university library with poetry by Sappho (Greek I think?) and some fantastic poems by Catullus and Martial. Catullus 16 and Martial's Non Amo Te are still some favs of mine. I quote the latter often to coworkers who irritate me :p

    Thank you so much! I'll keep checking back in case anyone has any other input too. You all are amazing.
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  13. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada

    Maybe manum consere, to remove any ambiguity?
  14. I 2nd this.
    But I like tempta Me the best.
  15. Hemo Rusticus The Lizard King

    • Civis Illustris
    I really must insist you not use frater for 'bro', unless you wanna sound like the man himself:
    The Hulk's birthday wish.png

    There is the perfectly viable abbreviation fra, attested in Late Latin and beyond, used chiefly among/regarding ecclesiastics. Now, whether or not it accurately communicate what the fratstar of today means when he says it, is between him and ol' Yahweh.

    Also, adeo can connote hostility, sic:
    To come up to one in a hostile manner, to assail, attack: aliquem: nunc prior adito tu, ego in insidiis hic ero, Ter. Ph. 1, 4, 52: nec quisquam ex agmine tanto audet adire virum, Verg. A. 5, 379: Servilius obvia adire arma jubetur, Sil. 9, 272.

    So I propose Adi me, fra. (It's even got the same syllable-count and accentuation, damn you all!)
    Edit: Accented adí me /a-'di: me:/.
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  16. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I'm rather doubtful about that fra... Though I've never come across it, I can perfectly imagine it could have been used as a manuscript abbreviation, but would it have been used really as word in speech? Wouldn't someone have read it out as frater anyway?
  17. Hemo Rusticus The Lizard King

    • Civis Illustris
    I was given to understand that monks would call each other Fra Guillelmo and so on, much in the way a secular person of the day might say 'Sir William', and nowadays we say 'Miss So-and-so'. But then again, I don't fret much about the Latinity of these modern thynges. If the OP thinks that tempta me frater is not altogether too far a cry from 'come at me, bro', then I don't know why this fra, attested or not, should be. But atte least will she have the moe opciones enowe.
  18. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    In Latin? If so, where were you given to understand that, if you can remember?

    I've seen that use of Fra in English before, I think, where it apparently comes from Italian: https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/fra

    But in Latin?
    Whether frater carries exactly the same overtones as "bro" is rather dubious too, indeed. But at least I've seen it used as a form of address among buddies in the Satyricon.
  19. Hemo Rusticus The Lizard King

    • Civis Illustris
    Well, presumably in a class I took on Medieval Latin, but I admit that 1) I never actually saw 'fra' in a text and 2) I wasn't *ahem* so invested in the class as I could have been. It's also very possible that I'm mis-remembering what you have in the link there: that Italian monks who knew Latin used the term.

    But I stand behind it anyway. Way I see it, the biggest concession we have to make is when translating 'bro'.
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  20. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    I wonder if we might use something like comes instead.

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