1. How would we?
  2. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    "Bro" doesn't literally mean "brother" but more something like "companion" -- like someone who's part of the same group of peers.
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  3. I actually think it's a callout of sorts.
    Like, come at Me, bro! Bro is almost like, "enemy" or something? Or is that just Me?
  4. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    Perhaps. I think this still implies "peer" in some respect. You wouldn't generally call someone of a drastically different social status a "bro" (unless, I suppose, you were trying to be insulting. Hmm...)
  5. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    I was also considering something like amice, used ironically, of course (but I think that would be clear).
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  6. Yes. It's like saying " What's up, my Friend?" when entering a fight.
  7. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada

    Erm, not exactly. :doh:
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  8. syntaxianus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Consider this too:

    Incursa in me, sodalis!

    = Rush at me, buddy!
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  9. lol, this is confusing.
  10. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada

    LOL. For reasons that I can't quite put my finger on, this sounds a bit odd.
  11. Yea...this is what happens when you use Latin words with modern slang meanings. Although some slang in Latin is pretty cool to Me, maybe this is one of those phrases that is weird to explain.
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  12. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    You don't say.
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  13. Lol, don't pounce.
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  14. syntaxianus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Maybe less of an LOL:

    huc age fac impetum, sodalis. / huc age tenta impetum, sodalis.

    Come on over here and make your assault / try an assault, buddy.
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  15. That is long, and doesn't really represent the colloquialness of the English phrase.
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  16. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    While it is long compared to the original phrase, I think
    huc age fac impetum, sodalis does have a certain colloquial ring to it.
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  17. I see what you mean.
    But I feel like there's something better, somewhere, already attested. Although I already like tempta Me.
    A long phrase could work, but it has to be good. Maybe huc age fac impetum, sodalis could touch that.
    Last edited by Issacus Divus, Apr 8, 2019
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  18. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Perhaps there's something suitable in epic poetry.
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  19. I'm looking for something like that right now.
    Mm, nothing yet.
    I'm thinking that the sodalis one is better in terms of phrasing, actually. Given, the original was only 4 short words, but the mood of the words fit perfectly in its meaning.
    Last edited by Issacus Divus, Apr 8, 2019
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  20. Aperture New Member

    We've had a blast reading all the suggestions. Thank you all for your time!
    Issacus Divus likes this.

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