death before dishonor

By oabb, in 'English to Latin Translation', Apr 1, 2007.

  1. firman New Member

    "Death before dishonor" would probably sound better in Klingon than Latin anyway ;)
  2. re QMF, antea vs. antequam.

    Antea is an adverb, and never goes with quam. It really means "beforehand".

    Antequam is a conjunction, meaning "before". Since you are using two main verbs, you need to use the conjunction.

    Antequam can be split into ante...quam, viz.:

    "ante moriar quam dedecorabor".
  3. QMF Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Virginia, US
    There we are...that makes sense. Thank you, Encolpius.
  4. aleena New Member

    I have a friend that wants to have the phrase "DEATH BEFORE DISHONOR" tattooed...he has been looking for translations online (and so have I) but we have come with different versions and some that to my rudimentary knowledge of latin sound simply wrong...
    ANY HELP?
    thank you
  5. aleena New Member

    I just posted the previous question...(death before dishonor) without checking out similar posts...SORRY...so, if I understand correctly, a good translation would be POTIUS MORI QUAM IGNOMINIA?

    On another note, how would the phrase LIVE LONG AND PROSPER be in Latin?
  6. Imber Ranae Ranunculus Iracundus

    • Civis Illustris
    For "Death before dishonor" I'd say Mors prae ignominia or perhaps Mors prae dedecore. The latter is probably better in a modern context, as dedecus can mean dishonorable conduct, whereas ignominia is simply disgrace from whatever (e.g. a general losing his army was considered disgraceful to the ancient Romans, regardless of whether there was actually any fault on his part when defeat was inevitable.)

    For the other: Vivas ac floreas.
  7. aleena New Member

    Thanks a lot on both counts...I like that Mors prae dedecore.

    the quote from Star Trek is just because i am such a trek fan...
  8. sbombard15 New Member

    Death Before Dishonor.

    Death Before Dishonor



    I have seen A LOT of different translations online and have no clue what one is right. Is there one correct phrase or is there a bunch of different phrases that are equally correct?
    In latin would it would mean To Die Rather Then Dishonor?

    Thanks for the hep.
  9. Imprecator Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Colchis
    Re: Death Before Dishonor.

    I'd say Mors Ante Dedecum, though there's a hundred ways you could translate this.
  10. Imber Ranae Ranunculus Iracundus

    • Civis Illustris
    Re: Death Before Dishonor.

    You could also do something like: Moriar potius/prius/citius quam dedecorer.
  11. sbombard15 New Member

    Re: Death Before Dishonor.

    Anyone know why there is so many completely different translations?
  12. scrabulista Consul

    • Consul
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Re: Death Before Dishonor.

    Many of them are likely wrong (if gotten from automated translators), but as Imprecator says, there are a hundred different "right" ways to do it.

    Imber Ranae's ways:

    Moriar potius quam dedecorer - "I will die more ably than I will be dishonored."
    Moriar prius quam dedecorer - "I will die before I will be dishonored"
    Moriar citius quam dedecorer - "I will die quicker than I will be dishonored."
    Imprecator's way:
    Mors Ante Dedecum - "Death before dishonor."

    Hmm. I don't see dedecum in WORDS; dedecus is there but it's 3rd declension neuter. (There are a number of words belonging to more than one declension.)

    So Mors Ante Dedecus would be yet another way.
  13. sbombard15 New Member

    Re: Death Before Dishonor.

    Thanks for taking the time to help me out.


    Are the first three translations here correct for literal translations? Is the fourth translation correct for "rather to die than dishonor"?

    1. Mors Ante Dedecum
    2. Mors ante ignominiam
    3. MORS ANTE INFAMIAM
    4. POTIUS MORI QUAM FOEDARI


    Also from what I understand all translations posted by everyone are all correct and it is up to me to just pick one?

    Thanks
  14. scrabulista Consul

    • Consul
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Re: Death Before Dishonor.

    Is dedecum attested? It might be an incorrect form of dedecus. Hold off on that one.

    ignominiam = "ignominy,"
    infamiam = "infamy,"
    potius mori quam foedari = "to die rather than to be disgraced."

    foedari is a passive infinitive. It means many things. "to be defiled, polluted, soiled, stained, disgraced, etc."
  15. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    Re: Death Before Dishonor.

    I think a major reason for Imber's suggestion is that Latin tends to shun away from nominal expressions when it also has the choice to express things verbally
  16. sbombard15 New Member

    Re: Death Before Dishonor.

    so what is the general census for the phrase I SHOULD use?
  17. sbombard15 New Member

    Re: Death Before Dishonor.

    bump
  18. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    Re: Death Before Dishonor.

    use Imber's suggestion
  19. Imber Ranae Ranunculus Iracundus

    • Civis Illustris
    Re: Death Before Dishonor.

    Couple of things: potius means "rather" or "preferably", not so much "more ably". And while citius does literally mean "quicker", that translation is somewhat misleading since its use here is a Latin idiom.

    Moriar potius quam dedecorer. = I'd rather die than be dishonored.
    Moriar prius quam dedecorer. = I'll die before I can be dishonored.
    Moriar citius quam dedecorer. = I'd sooner die than be dishonored.

    They all suggest more or less the same thing: a preference for death over living in dishonor.
  20. sbombard15 New Member

    Re: Death Before Dishonor.

    ok thanks for the help and explanations.

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