Declension of Satyricon

By meisenimverbis, in 'Latin Grammar Questions', Sep 21, 2019.

  1. meisenimverbis Active Member

    Location:
    Rio de Janeiro
    Should I treat it as Satyricum, -i?
  2. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Satyricon in the title is the Greek genitive plural (Satyricon Libri, like Metamorphoseon Libri for Ovid's Metamorphoses). So the title should be second declension plural (Satyrica, Satyricon, Satyricis, etc.)
    Bitmap likes this.
  3. Gryllus Minor New Member

    sătĭrĭcus (on account of the confusion of the Roman Satira with the Greek Satyros, often erroneously written Sătўrĭcus; hence in the neutr. even with a Greek ending, Sătўrĭcon; cf. satirographus), a, um, adj. [satira], of or belonging to (Roman) satire, satiric, satirical: satirici carminis scriptor, Lact. 2, 4, 3; so, materia, Sid. Ep. 8, 11; Schol. Juv. 1, 168.—Substt.: 1. sătĭrĭcus, i, m., a writer of satires, a satirist, Sid. Ep. 1, 11; 4, 1.—2. Sătĭrĭcon, i, n., the title of a work of Petronius.
    Lewis, C. T., & Short, C. (1891). Harpers’ Latin Dictionary (p. 1633). New York; Oxford: Harper & Brothers; Clarendon Press.
  4. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Interesting. Conte's Latin Literature: A History was my source for Satyricon being genitive plural (as well as the fact that Wikipedia gives The Satyrica as another title). Another source is the Latin Library which calls it Satyricon Liber – that makes much more sense as a genitive plural. Your source seems to contradict that. But I think I trust Conte more.
  5. Gryllus Minor New Member


    Up until the time I checked L&S, I have always thought that it was genitive plural. I still do, but thought I would present the "alternative viewpoint" for full consideration.
  6. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Fair enough.
  7. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    I would have taken it to be a genitive plural as well (especially in 'satyricon liber'), but if you look at some older book titles, you can indeed find examples where people seem to have taken it as a neuter singular:

    [IMG]
  8. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    Whereas this one treats it like a genitive:

    [IMG]
  9. meisenimverbis Active Member

    Location:
    Rio de Janeiro
    In Latin-Latin it'd thus be Satyricorum Libri then... But it was kept in Greek declension for (the typical Roman) literary style. Okay, I get it. :thumb-up:

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