discessum est

By rothbard, in 'Latin Grammar Questions', Jan 7, 2017.

  1. rothbard Member

    Location:
    London
    I am a bit confused by the following sentence in Moreland and Fleischer (Review of Syntax: Units 12 to 18, no. 25, p. 310):

    "Hīs et tālibus pūgnīs inter nōs discessum est."

    Does it mean "we stopped fighting these and this kind of battles between us", or "people died by these and this kind of battles"?
    Last edited by rothbard, Jan 8, 2017
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    Location:
    Belgium
    I don't know the context, but neither of your interpretations looks really possible. It looks to me like (first, literally) "with these and such battles, it was parted (i.e. parting was made) between us", that is, after these battles and similar ones, we parted.
    rothbard likes this.
  3. rothbard Member

    Location:
    London
    Thanks. Unfortunately there is no additional context, as it was one of several separate sentences for translation. The only indication given in the book next to it is "Impersonal use of the passive", which doesn't add much. Unfortunately some sentences in this book don't seem to make a lot of sense.
  4. Aurifex Aedilis

    Location:
    England
    It looks to me like the Latin is faulty, or at least inadequate, as it stands.
  5. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    Location:
    Canada
    In what way?
  6. Aurifex Aedilis

    Location:
    England
    It seems to me there needs to be a verb (e.g. a past participle) to complete the sense of his et talibus pugnis? Without one it strikes me as a very vague kind of expression. What sense do you make of the sentence?
  7. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    Location:
    Canada
    Hmm, yes, good point. I suppose I sort of automatically supplied one, like Pacifica did, but it is rather vague.
  8. lepus New Member

    The sentence is adapted from Apuleius' Metamorphoses, Book II, Chapter 11: "His et talibus obgannitis sermonibus inter nos discessum est." Applying the principle of charity to the author's competence in Latin, I think that Pacifica had a good intuition about it. "After this an similar brawls (battles, quarrels, whatever you deem fitting) we parted."
    Last edited by lepus, Jan 11, 2017 at 4:25 PM
    rothbard likes this.
  9. Aurifex Aedilis

    Location:
    England
    I was casting doubt on the competence of the sentence - justly, I would maintain; I can't estimate the authors' overall competence.
    Of course; she's an expert at understanding the intended meaning of incompetent utterances, whether these are in Latin or English.
    Dantius likes this.
  10. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    :hysteric:
  11. Pacifica grammaticissima

    Location:
    Belgium
    Not sure whether to take that as an insult or as a compliment.
  12. Aurifex Aedilis

    Location:
    England
    Definitely a compliment. My suggesting you are skilled at divining what people intend to say when they haven't actually said it in so many words wasn't intended to imply that you have any share in others' incompetence.
    Pacifica likes this.
  13. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    Location:
    Canada
    That was my reaction as well.
  14. rothbard Member

    Location:
    London
    Thanks. If that had been the sentence in the book, I would have had no problems understanding it, after looking up "obgannitis". However, I was confused by "hīs et tālibus pūgnīs". People don't normally part with battles, so I thought "discedere" might be a euphemism for "pass away".
  15. lepus New Member

    Or "pugna" may be a hyperbole for quarrel. If the only context is a translation exercise, we are left to guessing.

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