1. JuliaC New Member

    I would be very grateful if you could tell me what possible connotations the combination of these two terms could have in Latin.

    I am hoping that they could (with a stretch) mean something along the lines of either 'Educators are called' or 'Called to education'.

    I am hoping that the 'Ed' could be taken for 'Educator' or 'Educatio', whichever makes more sense, or even both, giving two meanings.

    This is for a project name. I have researched as much as I can online, but am sadly ignorant of datives and ablatives. Thank you in advance!
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Hi,

    Ed vocato doesn't make any sense.
  3. JuliaC New Member

    I imagine that it doesn't, because the 'Ed' is a contraction of either educator or educatio, but is it near to anything? As this is for a project name, it is not necessary for it to be a direct translation, but I wanted to find out whether it lent itself to any rough concepts.
    If not, can the word 'vocato' be combined with educator or educatio in any way to mean 'Educators are called' or 'Called to education'? Or what would the form of the verb 'voco' be for these meanings?
    I appreciate you understanding the spirit of this post since I recognise that I have no base in Latin and, to some extent, don't know what I don't know!
  4. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Where is it from? As has been said, it's meaningless.
  5. JuliaC New Member

    I guess I am still not making myself clear :)
    It's not from anywhere, I am constructing an invented word to use as a project name. I would like it to be reminiscent of the vocation of education and hoped someone could give me a clue as to the Latin side of things. As far as I can make out, 'vocato' is a conjugation of the verb voco from which 'vocation' originated. Some of my (potentially not very reliable) research shows 'vocato' being translated as 'a calling'.
    Can anyone give me any crumbs? :)
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Vocato alone means... not much really, but literally either "with someone/someting having been called" or "to/for someone/something having been called".

    Vocatio can translate to "a calling".
  7. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    It is an invented phrase and has no real relationship to Latin.
  8. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Cinefactus — this is one of those threads that are posted in "Latin to English Translation" while the so-called Latin to be tranlslated into English is in fact a messed up attempt at translating English into Latin.
  9. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    Fixed
  10. JuliaC New Member


    Thank you, Pacifica, this is helpful information. I appreciate you being generous with your knowledge.

    P.D. This is not an English to Latin translation, but due diligent research on an invented name that may have been reminiscent of certain concepts in Latin. Just as those who branded the Nova car failed in their due diligence, so I wanted to be sure that vocato didn't have any accidental meanings that I was not aware of, and I also wanted to know if it had any useful language connections.

    Such a welcoming and friendly group! Glad that my concerns that I could have been arrogantly dismissed for my lack of knowledge in this particular arena were so adeptly allayed. It's so reassuring to find people who are both humble and intellectual :)

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