Everything happens for a reason, just believe

By Retz, in 'English to Latin Translation', Sep 23, 2012.

  1. Retz New Member

    I have had a tattoo in Latin on my ribs saying everything happens for a reason in Latin 'omnia cause fiunt' now i want to add another phrase underneath. i thought that just believe would be the best option, though am open to suggestions!

    I have tired to research the 'just believe' translation but only managed to get a translation on google translate and wasn't sure if it was correct....iustus credere??
  2. Aurifex Aedilis

    • Aedilis
    Location:
    England
    Who gave you the translation omnia cause fiunt?
  3. Retz New Member

    It's all over the Internet?! Other people's tattoos and on the Latin phrases website??
  4. Aurifex Aedilis

    • Aedilis
    Location:
    England
    Your point being?
  5. Adrian Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Perhaps something based on Cicero's De Finibus, 1
    Nihil fit sine causa. Simpliciter crede.
    Aurifex likes this.
  6. Aurifex Aedilis

    • Aedilis
    Location:
    England
    This is more like it.
    Please see the several older threads dealing with "Everything happens for a reason".

    At the risk of repeating some of the matter from these older threads, "everything happens for a reason" could also be translated:
    omnia quadam de causa fiunt
    or
    omnia certa quadam de causa fiunt
    or
    omnia quibusdam de causis fiunt
    or
    omnia certa quadam ratione fiunt
    ...to give only a few alternatives.

    For "just believe" I would prefer crede modo; or use a different verb perhaps.
    To the OP, your omnia cause fiunt is as unfortunate as it is wrong.
    bedtime, malleolus and Adrian like this.
  7. Adrian Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Aurifex, any particular verb in mind i.e. confidere, putare, reri?
    I checked with google, I believe our OP has made a typo, "Omnia causa fiunt" appears many times rather than "omnia cause fiunt". I feel pity for all those poor kids who "decorated" their skin with it. It appears they didn't make the elementary effort to consult it even with an online latin phrase book.
    Vero, est magna vis simplicitatis:(
  8. malleolus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    There is fiduciam habere as well as confidere.
    I would go for Fiduciam modo/tantum habe!
    Adrian likes this.
  9. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    "omnia causa fiunt" sounds pretty bad to me as well ... which makes you wonder which higher reason there is for people to have tattoes in horribly bad Latin
    Adrian likes this.
  10. Adrian Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    If it was a discrete small tattoo (kept only for oneself), I would understand it; however if someone makes a big tattoo with this inscription e.g. across the chest or below the neck (often with religious symbols) and then publishes his/hers tattoo on Facebook, Twitter or any other community site (often with comment below the picture like "Yo bros check out my new badass latin tattoo...) This truly I can not comprehend. Moreover I can not understand reaction of other people like "Oh Anna, that's a lovely ink you got yourself":confused:). Not to mention T-Shirts, Key pendants, medallions, rings, lucky coins and coffee mugs with "OMNIA CAUSA FIUNT"
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  11. Aurifex Aedilis

    • Aedilis
    Location:
    England
    Everything happens for a reason.
    Matthaeus and Adrian like this.
  12. malleolus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Companies like that should be sued.:rolleyes:
    Adrian likes this.
  13. Matthaeus Vemortuicida strenuus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Varsovia
    O Jupiter best and greatest, protector of all that is good and holy, deliver me from faulty, careless tattoo translations!
  14. Adrian Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    When I saw it, I could not believe my eyes. Indeed, everything happens for a reason...

    [IMG]
  15. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    This phrase was suggested on this forum a couple of years ago, but I never really liked it. I always though that the well-known proverb "nihil fit sine causa" was the best translation until socratidion alerted me to the fact that this originally applied to an understanding of cause and effect rather than there being a supernatural reason for every event.
  16. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    But the interpreted meaning of a proverb may change with time - for example ars longa vita brevis
    I still think that nihil fit sine causa is a better translation.
  17. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    it's certainly better than what is quoted somewhere up there ... depending on what "causa" means to you, it may probably work well, anyway. I also like omnia quadam de causa fiunt, though
  18. Corvinus13 New Member

    I know this thread is old, but...

    I agree that "nihil fit sine causa" is a good translation since (Cinefactus) "the interpreted meaning of a proverb may change with time." However, I also think the meaning of this contemporary proverb is akin to "everything has a good outcome (eventually, on a divine level, vel sim.)" and so I think using the Latin word "finis" would be appropriate. Thus "omne ad finem" or "omne ad finem ordinatum" would work.

    Thoughts?
  19. Aurifex Aedilis

    • Aedilis
    Location:
    England
    Looking at the ends of things is very different from looking at their causes, though it depends to some extent, I suppose, on your world view. Aquinas talks about a finem ordinatum.
  20. Corvinus13 New Member

    Corvinus Aurifici: yes, it was Aquinas I was looking at when I wrote that (although I believe it is not the "finem" that is "ordinatum", but the "aliquid"; Summa Theolgiae, Part 1, Question 22, Article 2). Anyway--you are right to distinguish causes and ends. My understanding of how the tatooers use "everything happens for a reason" is that it is ends-oriented, but obviously different people use it to mean different things.

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