1. Anonymous Guest

    Hi, can somebody please provide latin translation for 'family is everything'
    Thanks, Jay.
  2. WhiteLeo New Member

    I don't know if this is exactly right but here is my suggestion. "Omnia familia est" I would wait for other people to post just to be sure.
  3. howardh New Member

    I'm still relatively new to latin, but isn't omnia the nominative form? Shouldn't it be accusative?
  4. Diaphanus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Yes, it's the nominative (plural) form, but no, it should not be in the accusative, but in the nominative. When you link two words like that with the verb est, both are in the nominative.

    The form omnia can be in the accusative, but not in the above sentence.
  5. howardh New Member

    So can "Omnia familia est" mean both "Family is everything" and "Everything is family"?
  6. QMF Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Virginia, US
    Yes.
  7. howardh New Member

    In that case, how would you phrase it if you only want it to go one way? Like when you want to say that something belongs in a certain category (e.g. A square is a rectangle but a rectangle is not a square).
  8. QMF Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Virginia, US
    I'm...really not certain how Latin does that. It almost seems like one would have to provide a rigorous definition for any such circumstance.
  9. howardh New Member

    Alright, thanks.
  10. Cato Consularis

    • Consularis
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    Ah, but a rectangle can be a square...what you really want to say is "All squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares."

    Omnia quadra sunt rectiangula, at non omnis rectiangula sunt quadra.

    Not sure if rectiangulum = "rectangle", but really don't care to look it up right now :)
  11. Cato Consularis

    • Consularis
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    Ah, but a rectangle can be a square...what you really want to say is "All squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares."

    Omnia quadra sunt rectiangula, at non omnis rectiangula sunt quadra.

    Not sure if rectiangulum = "rectangle", but really don't care to look it up right now :)

    If you didn't want to be so explicit, perhaps you could indicate categorization using a partitive genitive with species (Quadra est species rectangulorum) or genus (rectangulum est genus polygonorum). Again, don't quote me on those mathematical terms...

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