Foolish man who approaches my throne, it was you who took what belongs to us..."

By Dash, in 'English to Latin Translation', Aug 4, 2019.

  1. Dash New Member

    "Foolish man who approaches my throne, it was you who took what belongs to us! I would not recommend any retaliation against the throne or else you will face the combined forces of all of the ten kingdoms!"

    and

    "Foolish woman! You do not understand the power of your adversary! We have spent thousands of years crafting the art of-actually, you will see shortly enough..."
  2. Ignis Umbra Ignis Aeternus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    USA
    Hi,

    I've got a few questions about these before they can be translated. In the first, what do you mean by "the throne"? Does it refer to the figures of authority in power, or is it meant to refer to a literal throne?

    In the second, what is the "art-of-actually"?

    Finally, what are these to be used for?
  3. Dash New Member

    Hiya

    I meant "the Throne" as in "figure of authority" and the "-" in "art of-actually" is supposed to represent an abrupt pause in the previous clause (art referring to "skill").

    This is for a game I'm making.

    Thank you for your help!
  4. Ignis Umbra Ignis Aeternus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    USA
    Ah; I understand now.

    No problem.

    For the first one, I'd suggest: Stulte ad imperium meum accedens, tu es qui quae nobis sunt cepisti! Tibi suadeo ne imperium aggrediaris, quia si facies, vim omnium decem regnorum patieris!

    For the second, I'd suggest: Stulta! Potestatem adversarii tui non intellegis! Milia annos artem fingimus--revera tu mox videbis...

    To my colleagues, I'm not entirely sure about the bolded words. There are probably better replacements.
  5. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    You can use the literal solium for throne.


    We had that discussion somewhere else ... I think Latin doesn't really use cleft sentences the way English does. I think it would be enough to say tu (ea) quae nobis sunt cepisti.


    imperium <> solium
    patieris sounds ok to me. But I would have written quod si feceris rather than quia si facies. (with quod being a relative pronoun rather than a "because").


    I suppose fingere is fine, but I would put it in the perfect. Also: annorum:
    (per) milia annorum artem finximus.
    Ignis Umbra likes this.
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Quae nobis sunt really should be quae nostra sunt.

    As for the cleft sentence, I actually think it's OK here, but the qui-quae succession may not be very elegant, so tu quae nostra sunt cepisti is better, or else tu es qui nostra cepisti. (Tu nostra cepisti would work too, of course.)

    I don't think aggrediaris conveys the meaning of retaliation. It conveys the meaning of an attack, but a retalation isn't just any attack; it's a revenge.
  7. Dash New Member

    Thanks!
  8. Ignis Umbra Ignis Aeternus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    USA
    Yes; I should've bolded that word too. I wasn't sure how exactly to render "retaliate". Would something like impetu remunerari be better, then?
  9. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Is that an idiom you've found somewhere?
  10. Ignis Umbra Ignis Aeternus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    USA
    No; I just thought of it. If it's not attested anywhere then I suppose it's not a good suggestion.
  11. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Things don't always have to be attested somewhere, but this one sounds strange to me.
  12. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Maybe something with ulcisci or vindictam exercere.
  13. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Or maybe in vicem aggrediaris.
  14. Ignis Umbra Ignis Aeternus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    USA
    This is probably better, since "retaliation" doesn't necessarily have to be an "attack", per se.
  15. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    remunerari sounds like it has too much of a positive connotation.

    That said, I actually took retaliation as simple aggression in the original post, so I would actually be fine with aggredi.

    If it really has to be retaliation in the sense of revenge, then maybe suadeo ne ultionem petas.
  16. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Well, if that was the OP's intention, he misused the word, then.

    I guess he'll tell us.
  17. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    That actually sounds like the best and easiest fix.
  18. Ignis Umbra Ignis Aeternus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    USA
    In vicem or invicem?
  19. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    Both are fine.
  20. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I'm not actually sure if you can militarily aggredi a whole institution or nation, though. I see it used mostly about attacking individuals, in a more direct manner.

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