For a tattoo: warrior of Christ

By davlac, in 'Religious Latin Phrases', Mar 18, 2006.

  1. davlac New Member

    I'm planning to get a tattoo and if somebody could translate this for me it would be very nice.

    Warrior of God

    Warrior of Christ

    Thanks for your help.
  2. Akela dat affluenter

    • Princeps Senatus
    Location:
    BC
    bellator dei
    bellator christi

    Just my translation, all right? There is a chance that ecclesiastical Latin has commonly used expressions to say the above, but I am not familiar with them. The grammar is right though :mrgreen:

    Where will the tattoo go?
  3. Akela dat affluenter

    • Princeps Senatus
    Location:
    BC
    bellator is masculine. If you need a feminine version, let me know.
  4. davlac New Member

    I'm plannig to get the tattoo on my chest. I don't know where I could get the ecclesiastical version maybe you could help me. With what sort of latin you translated those sentences i gave to you?

    Thank you
  5. jaffa Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    London
    miles Christi

    soldier of Christ: II Timothy 2:3
  6. davlac New Member

    just to be sure, miles Christi mean soldier of chris in ecclesiastical latin.
  7. jaffa Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    London
    It means soldier of Christ in Latin - (ecclesiastical Latin is the same language with a few different words and pronunciations but basically the same). If you use this then anyone would understand it as soldier of Christ.
    If they knew Latin that is! Hope this helps.
  8. davlac New Member

    you helped me a lot, i ve read somewhere milites christi, whats the difference with that one and the one you gave me.

    does bellator christi also mean the same thing as warrior of christ in ecclesiastical latin.
  9. Akela dat affluenter

    • Princeps Senatus
    Location:
    BC
    milites is plural.
  10. davlac New Member

    does bellator christi also mean the same thing as warrior of christ in ecclesiastical latin
  11. Akela dat affluenter

    • Princeps Senatus
    Location:
    BC
    I only mentioned ecclesiastical Latin because it was ecclesiastical Latin that was used by the Catholic church (not classical Latin, which was the language of the ancient times). There may have been an expression for 'warrior of Christ' that was commonly used by the Catholic church, which also used Latin (ecclesiastical). I would not know this expression, but it seems that miles christi could be it.

    I am sorry, I probably should not have mentioned ecclesiastical Latin at all - it has only brought in confusion so far :)

    Anyway, bellator and miles were both used both in classical and in ecclesiastical Latin. I purposely did not use later words for 'warrior' - choosing more common one bellator. Bellator means warrior, while miles means soldier. Just as in Engllish these words can sometimes be used interchangeably.

    In other words, take your pick, they are both fine :)
  12. jaffa Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    London
    Yes, bellator is used in ecclesiastical latin as warrior. I found the word in the writings of Tertullian.
    Miles Christi seems to be more common in biblical texts though.
  13. jaffa Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    London
    Akela, we just posted at exactly the same time!
  14. davlac New Member

    Thanks to all of you, you helped me a lot. ;)
  15. Akela dat affluenter

    • Princeps Senatus
    Location:
    BC
    Spooky :shock: Too bad I didn't view the thread after I posted.

    @davlac: Good luck with the process.
  16. Anonymous Guest

    Wow, i was asking this same question. Thanks guys!

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