Video Gladiator (2000): Latin Subtitles Available.

By bathtime, in 'Latin Language Resources', Dec 24, 2017.

  1. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Oh, and, of course, si in French can also introduce indirect questions, and there it can take the future tense (like "if" in English). But our discussion was about conditionals, anyway, and in phrases like "if you come tomorrow" or "if that happens someday", French doesn't use the future tense, that's the point.
    Godmy likes this.
  2. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    Thanks for that information!
  3. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    In Czech we use different phrasing for find oneself somewhere and find oneself doing something, in the latter we would possibly phrase it as "if you suddenly do something[verb in the future tense]..."

    I guess that would work in Latin, although I don't say there doesn't exist other way, but it's one probably plausible suggestion.
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Yeah, the use of something like subito as a potential solution in some cases came to my mind as well...
  5. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    Also if you by chance [verb in future tense]
    There is no established way in Czech for the latter, only for the former. Latin could work similarly.

    right...
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    What does Czech do for the former? Is it just literally like English? Just curious.
  7. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    Hmm, no it's some special verb, the root of the verb is one variant of "to feel" with the prefix which seems to mean "around" + a reflexive pronoun (in Czech it's se which in Latin would be mē, we use just one reflexive for all persons :D), but we never analyze/understand it as some "circumsentiō mē", nobody really understands the etymology, it just has that one meaning for us, that's all.
  8. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    I mean, it's a pretty established way to say it, but you can say as well (in a less elegant speech maybe, I'm not sure so much about the registers here at the moment) "And I was suddenly at..."
  9. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Interesting!

    In French we have pretty much the same construction as in English, se retrouver. The only difference is that there is this re- prefix, but it has here lost its proper meaning as far as I can tell. So it's sort of literally "to find oneself back/again" but I don't feel like the "back/again" meaning is still really present.

    It's possible to say both se retrouver dans tel ou tel endroit, "to find oneself in such and such place" and se retrouver en train de faire ceci ou cela, lit. "to find oneself in [the] process of doing this or that", i.e. "to find oneself doing this or that", or yet again it can be used with adjectives, past participles and the like as in "to find oneself lost in the woods" and such.
    Godmy likes this.
  10. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    Cool, now one would have to see if other Germanic languages deal with that this way or the English gradually calqued the French version of a sort :p (or it may be a coincidence...)
  11. Gabriele Albarosa New Member

    Hi! ...Thank you “bathtime"! I only just came across this as I kind of let my Gladiator translation sit in the background for 15 years… until last week when I moved it to a new location (need to get rid of the copy on the original servers)…

    NEW URL: https://galbarosa.com/gladiator/

    Over the next few months I am planning to attach an audio version if I get round to it. As I do so I will review it again after such a long time, but any comments / suggestions / corrections are welcome! I have already made a couple of corrections based on your kind feedback.

    Ah, by the way - I am not a distinguished academic, just an Italian bloke living in London with a passion for languages, in particular Latin and Greek. The translation took me 2 years - back in 2002-3 - as a part time, late-night endeavour a few evenings per month when I was not too tired coming back from work.

    The intention was always serious and the approach rigorous, with much of the time spent trying to ensure, to the extent possible, that the Latin words and expressions used were all pre-II century AD (as opposed to later Latin).

    However, like any large undertaking… you sometimes lower your guard or simply make mistakes and it is thanks to people like you now and others before you - over a rather long span of time now - that I can incrementally improve it.

    I went through all your comments and provided relevant responses - in the order of the comments. THANK YOU!

    Pacifica Grammaticissima:

    2.2.2 "Nullus hostis contra quem pugnare superest, Caesar.”
    Clarification: Nullus superest hostis (there are no more enemies) contra quem pugnare (against whom to fight)

    2.3.4 ipse victorem discessit > oops! Changed it to "Ipse victoriam consecutus est.

    Dantius:

    2.1.3 Nisi vere moribundus esset, ne nos convocavisset… > oops! Changed it to “non”

    Godmy:

    1.4.12. estis in Elysium > oops! In Elysio. I also changed in vitae spatium to …spatio. All the other in + acc in this passage are deliberate, to convey movement (in space or time). No apology needed, thank you for spending your time.

    Dantius:

    (on the use of in+acc): thank you. See above. I did think Godmy was right with regards to Elysio and spatio.

    Godmy:

    thank you again for your inputs. Let me reassure you there was nothing "casually put” - just genuine mistakes you and others are kindly and thankfully picking up on, or differences in interpretation. However, I am fully aware that whenever you stick your neck out you have to take some risks… as Cicero put it:
    De Oratore I. xxviii. 130. Hanc ego absolutionem perfectionemque in oratore desiderans, a qua ipse longe absum, facio impudenter; mihi enim volo ignosci, ceteris ipse non ignosco;

    Godmy:

    1.3.1 ...tormenta illa te promovere iussi: destinata non feriunt. Explanation: destinata is acc. “they (tormenta) will not hit the target”.

    1.4.12. Si adequitatis…hypothetical period of the first type / reality. Chosen to reflect the vivid, matter of fact way in which Maximus utters the joke.
    The accusative is a choice: to render the movement into space as the riders gallop in the fields.
    Sputum can refer to a period/portion of time.

    Pacifica:

    1.3.1 destinata…> yes. As above.

    Pacifica / Godmy:

    On “to find oneself in a place/situation”. My preference - not out of lazyness - was to keep Maximus’ utterance immediate and streamlined rather than attempting too literal a translation of “finding oneself”. Hence also the use of hypothetical period of type I.
  12. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Hi, thanks for your post. As it's a bit long I'll only respond to one point right now, which I can respond to without going back and looking at all the contexts etc.:
    I thought that was what you meant, but the infinitive isn't used that way in Latin. You need a relative clause with the subjunctive (contra quem pugnemus/pugnetur... or whatever person makes sense in the context = literally: "against whom we/one... may fight" = Latin way of saying "against whom to fight").
  13. Gabriele Albarosa New Member

    Pacifica, looked at it again. I agree - and thank you. Adjusted to:
    Nullus superest hostis contra quem pugnandum sit, Caesar.

    General question: is there a reason why most people in this forum seem to be using aliases? ...Am I missing a trick?

    "Bathtime", I just realised the actual effort that must have been involved in creating the .srt file.

    THANK YOU. It's not xmas anymore but it feels like Christmas to me!

    I will incorporate this in the new Gladiator website, www.galbarosa.com/gladiator (let me know if you no longer what to stay anonymous - ...why do people here seem to do so...?) and will edit it as others and I contribute further reviews.

    Ciao, G

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