Video Gladiator (2000): Latin Subtitles Available.

By bathtime, in 'Latin Language Resources', Dec 24, 2017.

  1. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Oh, and, of course, si in French can also introduce indirect questions, and there it can take the future tense (like "if" in English). But our discussion was about conditionals, anyway, and in phrases like "if you come tomorrow" or "if that happens someday", French doesn't use the future tense, that's the point.
    Godmy likes this.
  2. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    Thanks for that information!
  3. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    In Czech we use different phrasing for find oneself somewhere and find oneself doing something, in the latter we would possibly phrase it as "if you suddenly do something[verb in the future tense]..."

    I guess that would work in Latin, although I don't say there doesn't exist other way, but it's one probably plausible suggestion.
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Yeah, the use of something like subito as a potential solution in some cases came to my mind as well...
  5. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    Also if you by chance [verb in future tense]
    There is no established way in Czech for the latter, only for the former. Latin could work similarly.

    right...
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    What does Czech do for the former? Is it just literally like English? Just curious.
  7. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    Hmm, no it's some special verb, the root of the verb is one variant of "to feel" with the prefix which seems to mean "around" + a reflexive pronoun (in Czech it's se which in Latin would be mē, we use just one reflexive for all persons :D), but we never analyze/understand it as some "circumsentiō mē", nobody really understands the etymology, it just has that one meaning for us, that's all.
  8. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    I mean, it's a pretty established way to say it, but you can say as well (in a less elegant speech maybe, I'm not sure so much about the registers here at the moment) "And I was suddenly at..."
  9. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Interesting!

    In French we have pretty much the same construction as in English, se retrouver. The only difference is that there is this re- prefix, but it has here lost its proper meaning as far as I can tell. So it's sort of literally "to find oneself back/again" but I don't feel like the "back/again" meaning is still really present.

    It's possible to say both se retrouver dans tel ou tel endroit, "to find oneself in such and such place" and se retrouver en train de faire ceci ou cela, lit. "to find oneself in [the] process of doing this or that", i.e. "to find oneself doing this or that", or yet again it can be used with adjectives, past participles and the like as in "to find oneself lost in the woods" and such.
    Godmy likes this.
  10. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    Cool, now one would have to see if other Germanic languages deal with that this way or the English gradually calqued the French version of a sort :p (or it may be a coincidence...)

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