How very miserable to have been left out from the age of drama!

By Hadassah Branch, in 'English to Latin Translation', Apr 17, 2019 at 7:02 AM.

  1. Hadassah Branch Member

    Location:
    Grove of Dodona
    How would you guys translate this: How very miserable to have been left out from the age of drama!

    Making a guess out of informed dovetailing and amalgamations, I came up with Quam miserrimum saeculo dramatis est exclusisse.

    Is this even close or if not, what should be done with it? Thanks to all of you in advance.

    Edit: I'm putting this up in our restaurant because you may guess what kind of congregations we get here!
    Last edited by Hadassah Branch, Apr 17, 2019 at 7:47 AM
  2. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    The sentence would be grammatical if it were
    quam miser(rim)um (est) saec(u)lo dramatis exclusum esse.

    I don't know if there's not a better way to put it, though.
    Hadassah Branch likes this.
  3. Hadassah Branch Member

    Location:
    Grove of Dodona
    Thank you for that! Ah yes, I saw right through the perfect passive infinitive! Arrgh.
    Am starting to paint our sign now. Thanks! (Does the Latin drama still have the same definition as the modern one, or is it restricted to the theatrical art? Any other substitutes, but aside from the words tumult, chaos and the like?)
  4. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    I thought what you meant was drama in a theatre. The word drama does not have the same connotion in Latin when it comes to ideas like "causing a drama".

    I'm also not quite sure if you find quam + superlative in an exclamation. I wonder if Pacifica knows.
  5. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I don't know if there isn't an instance to be found somewhere, but, at any rate, I don't think it's usual. It strikes me as a bit odd.
    Bitmap and Hadassah Branch like this.
  6. Hadassah Branch Member

    Location:
    Grove of Dodona
    Do you propose that I should just keep it in the positive degree?

    It does seem odd, as it might come off as the quam in the conjuction form.
  7. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    That's what I would do.

    Now, there remains the "drama" issue.
  8. Hadassah Branch Member

    Location:
    Grove of Dodona
    Hmmm. Yes, I don't mean theatrical drama neither do I mean drama as in tumultus etc. Rather, I aim for the drama in modern connotation. Perhaps drama as in exciting action and phenonemena (e.g. such as that in the age of Roman emperors and civil wars)?

    Thrill, excitement, adventure and buzzing life as a whole.
  9. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    Frankly, I have no idea.
  10. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    Insania?
  11. Hadassah Branch Member

    Location:
    Grove of Dodona
    Hmmm, with the help of your insania proposition, I think I'll go with Bacchanalia. Just a last question, though, Is Bacchanalia in the first declension or is it something else?

    Quam miserum saeculo Bacchanalium est exclusum esse?
  12. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena

    the est is in a strange spot there. I suppose it still works, but why not put it behind miserum for clarity?
    You can make the reference to the Bacchus festival of course. Grammatically, your sentence is right. A slightly shorter (but more generalising) way of putting it might be to say saeculo bacchandi.
    Hadassah Branch likes this.
  13. Hadassah Branch Member

    Location:
    Grove of Dodona
    This is a great idea! Bacchor is a more apt choice as I am alluding to the manner in which the festivals were held rather than the very Bacchic celebrations themselves. Thanks for the patience Bitmap! I'll post the picture of the sign here when I'm done with it. ;)

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