Love I belong to you

By LordHater, in 'English to Latin Translation', Jun 7, 2019.

  1. LordHater New Member

    For translation: "I belong to you"
    alternatively: "I belong entirely to you"

    I don't know which one would be better, because I don't know how much space it will take. This is for an engravement on a small, metal plate, worn around wrist.

    "I" is a girl, "you" is a man.
    Meaning: literal, the girl that is wearing something with this engravement belongs to the man that gave her the something.

    I found something from a prayer ("totus tuus ego sum" if I recall), but if it's possible, I would prefer to avoid religious context. In addition, I have no idea if it's correct in the meaning I want to communicate.
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Hi,

    Totus tuus ego sum is correct but for a male speaker. It needs to be adjusted to work for a female. There is also one word (ego) that isn't really necessary here, so it can be removed to make the phrase shorter.

    Tua sum = I belong to you.
    Tota tua sum = I belong entirely to you.
    Gregorius Textor and LordHater like this.
  3. LordHater New Member

    That was extremely fast, thank you very much :)

    It's much shorter and simpler than I imagined. Should fit as an engravement nicely.

    Just to clarify, in case I will need something longer (two rows of text for example): "Tota tua ego sum" is a proper sentence if "ego" is used? And "ego" means "I", correct?
  4. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena

    You don't need the personal pronoun in Latin (like in Spanish), but you can add it for emphasis if you want. Latin word order is free, so you can put the ego wherever you want (e.g. like in your version). The most common word order would probably be to write "Tota ego tua sum."
    LordHater likes this.
  5. LordHater New Member

    Thank you both, again. You were very helpful.
  6. Gregorius Textor Member

    Location:
    Ohio, midwestern U.S.A.

    Although the words came from a prayer and "totus tuus" was the motto of Pope St John Paul II, there is nothing intrinsically religious about them. It all depends on who is being addressed (Maria, in his case).
    Issacus Divus and Pacifica like this.
  7. meisenimverbis Active Member

    Location:
    Rio de Janeiro
    Wouldn't it be possible to use the dative here? (Totus/a) tibi sum.
  8. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    It would be weird, I think.
    Gregorius Textor likes this.
  9. meisenimverbis Active Member

    Location:
    Rio de Janeiro

    There is a use of dative as possessive, and in this case, I think it makes sense. (It's still used in French, "le stylo est à moi" for is mine.) In the case of belong to you it seems to make sense too. But I'm never too sure, so...
  10. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena

    The dative of possession directs the attention to the thing that is possessed, while the genitive (or the possessive pronoun in this case) puts the possessor in the focus. That's why the dative sounds a bit weird in this context.
  11. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    The similarity with the French "à moi" construction is misleading. "À moi" is equivalent to "mine", whereas the dative of possession denotes the person for whom such and such thing exists or is present (as a possession). It conveys an idea more similar to "I have X or Y".
    Last edited by Pacifica, Jun 15, 2019
  12. meisenimverbis Active Member

    Location:
    Rio de Janeiro
    Doesn't the expression "I belong to you" emphasize "you"?
  13. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I'm not sure, but "X belongs to Y" typically translates to X est [possessive adjective or genitive noun representing Y], while X est [dative Y] conveys an idea more like "Y has X".
  14. meisenimverbis Active Member

    Location:
    Rio de Janeiro

    The focus of the meaning, I mean. When someone says I belong to you, the person is saying that the one who really matters is the other one, not him or herself.
  15. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    See my post above.

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