I need grammar practice!

By Lysandra, in 'General Latin Chat (English)', Oct 10, 2016.

  1. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Interesting!
  2. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Here's the original passage, if you're interested:
    erat eo tempore in nobis summa gracilitas et infirmitas corporis, procerum et tenue collum: qui habitus et quae figura non procul abesse putatur a vitae periculo, si accedit labor et laterum magna contentio. eoque magis hoc eos quibus eram carus commovebat, quod omnia sine remissione, sine varietate, vi summa vocis et totius corporis contentione dicebam. Itaque cum me et amici et medici hortarentur ut causas agere desisterem, quodvis potius periculum mihi adeundum quam a sperata dicendi gloria discedendum putavi. sed cum censerem remissione et moderatione vocis et commutato genere dicendi me et periculum vitare posse et temperatius dicere, ut consuetudinem dicendi mutarem, ea causa mihi in Asiam proficiscendi fuit. itaque cum essem biennium versatus in causis et iam in foro celebratum meum nomen esset, Roma sum profectus.
  3. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    :D
  4. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Before I attempt a translation, I was wondering what the best translation is for legatio. I’ve seen it several times before in Cicero, but I’m not sure whether to translate it as legations or embassies or something else.
    Last edited by Lysandra, Jun 18, 2017 at 8:45 PM
  5. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    It's probably "embassy" here. It's a group of ambassadors in this context.
    Lysandra likes this.
  6. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Hmm...this sentence is really confusing me (you might say it's tam perplexus o_O ). I mean I understand each of the words, but I just can't put it all together. This is what I have for the first part:

    To this very confused embassy because he had not been within easy enough reach

    I don't know what to do with satis, and I'm probably overthinking it.
  7. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    You're close. "perplexus" here means "confusing" rather than "confused". The subject of "erat" is not "he", but "it" (quid responderet). You could translate "in promptu" as "clear" or something like that. It's hard to translate it literally.
    Lysandra likes this.
  8. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    To this very confusing embassy because what had been said had not been clear enough, he said that he had sent embassies to them who spoke about the things which concerned them and himself in common.
  9. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    "what had been said" — "responderet" is a form of "to respond". Here the sense is almost deliberative, like "what he should respond".
    "had not been" — tense
    "he had sent" — tense as well
    "qui ... loquerentur" — it's impossible to tell grammatically, but this is a relative clause of purpose, not just a factual relative clause like "who spoke"
  10. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    To this very confusing embassy because what he should respond was not clear enough, he said that he would send embassies to them who would speak about the things which concerned them and himself in common.
  11. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Btw, after I've finished this sentence, could you ask me to translate something from Catullus, Propertius, Horace or Ovid? Those are the four authors I need to study for my upcoming exam. :bounce:
  12. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    The second "embassies" would probably be better translated as "ambassadors" (it's legatos, not legationes).
    Other than that, you've got it, though it would be good to rearrange the word order: "because it was not clear enough what he should respond to this very confusing embassy..."
  13. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Here's some Catullus:

    Quaeris, quot mihi basiationes
    tuae, Lesbia, sint satis superque.
    quam magnus numerus Libyssae harenae
    lasarpiciferis iacet Cyrenis
    oraclum Iovis inter aestuosi
    et Batti veteris sacrum sepulcrum;
    aut quam sidera multa, cum tacet nox,
    furtivos hominum vident amores:
    tam te basia multa basiare
    vesano satis et super Catullo est,
    quae nec pernumerare curiosi
    possint nec mala fascinare lingua.
  14. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Thanks!

    You ask, Lesbia, how many kisses of yours
    are enough and more for me.
    As many as the great number of Libyan sands
    that lie on silphium-bearing Cyrene
    between the oracle of Jove
    and sacred tomb of the fiery old Battus;
    or as many as the stars, when the night is silent,
    that watch the silent love affairs of men:
    to kiss you so many kisses
    is enough and more for crazy Catullus,
    which neither the curious are able to count
    nor an evil tongue to curse.
  15. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Good, except aestuosi seems to be going with Iovis.
  16. AoM Rosa Caerula

    • Civis Illustris
    *unleashes inner teacher*

    Translate the following passage and answer the questions below.

    Propertius - II.34b (line numbers added for questions)

    me iuvet hesternis positum languere corollis, 1
    quem tetigit iactu certus ad ossa deus.
    Actia Vergilium custodis litora Phoebi,
    Caesaris et fortis dicere posse ratis,
    qui nunc Aeneae Troiani suscitat arma 5
    iactaque Lavinis moenia litoribus.
    cedite Romani scriptores, cedite Grai!
    nescio quid maius nascitur Iliade.

    corolla, ae - little crown/garland
    suscito (1) - lift up, raise, arouse, awaken

    1. What is the mood of iuvet and why? (line 1)

    2. Lines 1, 3, and 6 employ the same poetic device. Name the device.

    3. What is the antecedent of qui? (line 5)

    4. What is the case of Iliade and why? (line 8)
    Lysandra likes this.
  17. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    I'm trying to find the main verb of the second sentence and not succeeding. All I see are infinitives and a relative clause. Does the "iuvet" carry on to the next sentence?
  18. AoM Rosa Caerula

    • Civis Illustris
    I hadn't considered that, but I'm not sure it works. I was thinking implied indirect speech or some sort of exclamation. It definitely caught me off guard.
  19. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    It could be an exclamatory infinitive, just without the "ne" (a similar construction to "mene incepto desistere victam?" in the Aeneid), I guess.
  20. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris

    I'll answer the questions first because if I get the questions wrong then my translation will also be wrong. So for number 1, I believe iuuet is a jussive subjunctive.

Share This Page

 

Our Latin forum is a community for discussion of all topics relating to Latin language, ancient and medieval world.

Latin Boards on this Forum:

English to Latin, Latin to English translation, general Latin language, Latin grammar, Latine loquere, ancient and medieval world links.