I need grammar practice!

By Lysandra, in 'General Latin Chat (English)', Oct 10, 2016.

  1. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Tasmania
    1) prolative infinitives following ‘sine’
    2) apposition to ‘me’ (allow me to speak as earth and ashes)
    3) genitive pronoun because ‘misereberis’ takes a genitive
    4) I’ve tried not to use a dictionary for this, but I believe the uses of ‘quod’ and ‘quia’ here are non-classical.
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Quia is indeed used in a non-classical way, but the use of quod (as a relative pronoun) is classical .
  3. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Tasmania
    Well, the other thing that I looked a little strange to me (and this is the only non-classical text I've read) is the use of 'an' as 'or'.
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    That's classical as well.

    Hint: the second non-classical construction is in this bit: quoniam ecce misericordia tua est, non homo, inrisor meus, cui loquor.
  5. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Tasmania
    Oh, it's the 'quoniam', isn't it? That was actually going to be my first answer, but then I convinced myself it wasn't.
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    No. Hint: It's toward the end.
  7. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Tasmania
    'inrisor' instead 'irrisor'? But that's just a word not a construction. Does it have something to do with 'cui loquor'? I've gone through almost the whole sentence now. :D
  8. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Yes, it's cui loquor. Loquor is classically constructed with cum rather than the dative.
    Lysandra likes this.
  9. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Tasmania
    I'd forgotten that. Here's my translation.

    But nonetheless allow me to speak in the presence of your mercy, nonetheless allow me to speak as earth and ash. Behold because it is your mercy, not a man, my mocker, to whom I speak. And perhaps you laugh at me, but turning back you will have pity on me. For what is it that I want to say, Lord, except that I don’t know from where I came here, I say, into this death-giving life or life-giving death?
  10. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    - Maybe "me, [who am] earth and ash" would be better than "me... as earth and ash".

    - "Behold because": why the inversion?

    - Your punctuation after "I say" makes me suspect that you may be misunderstanding the Latin. Dico isn't absolute (set apart from the rest). (Hint: in an idiomatic translation, another verb than "say" would likely be used.)

    - "Death-giving" and "life-giving" are unlikely to be what's meant by mortalem and vitalem.
  11. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Tasmania
    Auete omnes, is there any chance of a few more practice questions? I am busy studying in preparation for my final semester of Latin (about five weeks to go before the start of classes). I believe we will be doing Silver Age Latin, in particular Statius.
  12. Hemo Rusticus Tom Bombadillo

    • Civis Illustris
    I'll be happy to oblige, настоящая моя подруга.
    Here's a bit of Seneca's De ira:
    Quid singula persequor? Cum 1uideris forum multitudine *refertum et **saepta concursu omnis frequentiae plena et illum circum in quo maximam 2sui partem populus ostendit, hoc scito: istic ***tantundem esse uitiorum quantum hominum.
    *not from fero, ferre! **here a noun, neu. pl. 'enclosed zone (of the Campus Martius)' *** < adj. tantusdem 'just so great, every bit as much'
    1: Parse uideris?
    2: What the hell is this?!

    Bonus:
    What is the meaning of consuetus? 1st principal part?
  13. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Tasmania
    Thanks, Hemo!

    1: 2nd person sg. perfect active subjunctive, subjunctive because it’s in a circumstantial cum clause
    2: genitive of reflexive pronoun ‘se’

    Bonus: ‘consuetus’ means ‘customary’, I didn’t know it’s 1st principle part but found out from dictionary it’s ‘consuesco'
  14. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    I think the first is rather a future perfect indicative. The key is the future scito in the main clause, and the fact that it's more of a general statement which wouldn't usually use a perfect subjunctive.
  15. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Tasmania
    Good point. I should have thought about it a bit more.
  16. Hemo Rusticus Tom Bombadillo

    • Civis Illustris
    Reddibisne Anglice?
  17. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Is reddibis an archaic form or were you confusing it with redeo, redire?
  18. Hemo Rusticus Tom Bombadillo

    • Civis Illustris
    Ita'st. Got a reputation to uphold, nostin quod deico, o Elephantullilule?
  19. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    A reputation for weird language, you mean? :D
    Monstrous! :eek:
    Dantius likes this.
  20. Hemo Rusticus Tom Bombadillo

    • Civis Illustris
    Hoce negarier neuolo. :browaction1:
    Pacifica likes this.

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