I need grammar practice!

By Lysandra, in 'General Latin Chat (English)', Oct 10, 2016.

  1. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Yes.
  2. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Tasmania
    I'm really struggling with the rest:
    5. dative of advantage
    6. partitive genitive, 'enixa' is nom. sg. fem. agreeing with 'sus'
  3. Hemo Rusticus Tom Bombadillo

    • Civis Illustris
    I don't really know why I went after 'tibi', but I like your answer! I suppose it could also technically be 'dative of agent' w a participle, but there's no reason to think it is. Also, point of interest: the second 'i' in tibi, while historically long, may also be short by 'iambic shortening'.
    You're looking good so far.

    solo is a bit of nastiness. It is tempting to call it 'ablative', since it is the place 'on which' the sow is 'reclining' ('ablative of place where/locative ablative'), but often times a 'compound verb' (one with a preverbative/prefix like 're-, de-, super-' etc.) simply takes a 'dative' by itself. Of course, the morphology alone doesn't tell us which, because by the time of Classical Latin, the o-stem ablative no longer ends in a dental sound.
    Lysandra likes this.
  4. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena

    I would consider it to be an ablative as well.
  5. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    So would I.

    I wouldn't call capitum a partitive genitive.
  6. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena

    What would you call it? explicativus?
  7. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Maybe. Or "genitive of description"? I'm not sure what the proper term is. In any case the fetus aren't only part of the capita, that's why I wouldn't call capitum partitive. Rather, capitum is sort of a description of fetus.
  8. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena

    The German term for that would be Genetivus explicativus or definitivus. Obviously, I never know what the English terminology is :)
  9. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    You might perhaps call it a genitive of quality. But ah, well, who cares anyway.
  10. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Description is the proper term.
  11. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/courses/ap-latin/exam

    The AP Latin exam asks about Vergil and Caesar. You can see the free-response questions for 2019 and previous years, if you want to practice doing the Vergil questions. They're pretty easy compared to what Hemo asked, though.

    Incidentally, the 2018 multiple choice questions contained a passage from a Cicero speech, but the multiple choice questions are not available on the internet :/
    Lysandra likes this.
  12. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Here's another kind of exercise.

    Complete this excerpt from Cicero's Pro Roscio Amerino by choosing the correct option in each of the parentheses. Don't look it up, of course, as that would defeat the purpose of the exercise.

    [1] Credo ego (vobis/vestrum/vos), iudices, mirari, quid sit, quod, cum tot summi oratores hominesque nobilissimi (sedere/sedeant/sedebunt), ego potissimum (surrexissem/surrexisse/surrexerim), is, qui neque (aetate/aetatis/aetatem) neque (ingenio/ingeni/ingenium) neque (auctoritate/auctoritatis/auctoritatem) sim cum his, qui sedeant, comparandus. Omnes hi, (qui/quibus/quos) videtis adesse (in/propter/quod) hac causa, iniuriam novo scelere (conflare/conflatam/conflo) putant oportere defendi, (defendunt/defendant/defendere) ipsi propter iniquitatem temporum non audent. Ita fit, (ut/quod/quales) adsint propterea, quod officium sequuntur, taceant autem (idcirco/ut/quamquam), quia periculum vitant. [2] Quid ergo? Audacissimus ego (omnibus/omnis/ex omnibus)? Minime. An (tanto/tantum/tanti) officiosior quam ceteri? Ne (istius/iste/istud) quidem laudis ita sum cupidus, ut aliis eam praereptam (velim/volo/voluissem). Quae me igitur res praeter ceteros (impulerit/impellet/impulit), ut (causa/causam/causae) Sex. Rosci reciperem? Quia, si qui istorum dixisset, (qui/quorum/quos) videtis adesse, in quibus summa auctoritas est atque amplitudo, si verbum de re publica fecisset, id, quod in hac causa (fit/fieri/fiet) necesse est, multo plura dixisse, quam (dixisset/dixerit/diceret), putaretur. [3] Ego autem si (omnes/omnia/omnem), quae dicenda sunt, libere dixero, nequaquam tamen similiter oratio mea exire atque in volgus emanare poterit. Deinde quod ceterorum neque dictum (obscurum/obscuros/obscuri) potest esse (prae/propter/ex) nobilitatem et amplitudinem neque temere dicto concedi (prae/propter/ex) aetatem et prudentiam. Ego si (quem/quid/autem) liberius dixero, vel occultum esse (minime/propterea/neque), quod nondum ad rem publicam accessi, vel (ignoscere/ignosci/ignoscant) adulescentiae meae poterit; tametsi non modo (ignoscere/ignotae/ignoscendi) ratio verum etiam (cognoscere/cognitae/cognoscendi) consuetudo iam de civitate sublata est.
    Lysandra and Bitmap like this.
  13. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    oh I loved doing these exercises when you used to put them on the language quiz
  14. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Tasmania
    Thank you for the explanation!

    Ah, that makes much more sense. If I understand correctly, the translation would be 'the sow having delivered a litter of thirty young'.
  15. Lysandra Canis

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Tasmania
    Thank you for the cool exercise! I'll attempt it first thing tomorrow morning when my mind is fresh.

    Great idea! I'll definitely go through some of the exercises there.
  16. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena

    Well, that's essentially what it means, but your translation sounds a bit like you take triginta with capitum (in which case it would actually be a partitive genitive), but triginta goes with fetus.

    In
    sus triginta capitum fetūs enixa
    fetus is a plural accusative. triginta goes with fetus and capitum is the descriptive genitive of fetus. I suppose in English you can kind of mirror it by saying "the sow (sus) having brought forth (enixa) thirty births (triginta fetus) of heads (capitum = living things = young pigs)" ... you would obviously arrive at your translation from there – I just wanted to make sure you get the structure right.
  17. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Oh, if you're taking triginta with fetus then I'm not quite sure what kind of genitive it would be.
    Technically the term "genitive of description" only applies when the genitive is an adjective and a noun, like vir magnae virtutis. So if triginta agreed with capitum, then it would be a genitive of description. But I'm not sure what you'd call capitum alone.
  18. Hemo Rusticus Tom Bombadillo

    • Civis Illustris
    I sort of leapt at 'partitive' because of the numeral, but here it's functioning quite regularly as an indeclinable adjective. I take fetus rather as a 'poetic plural' (which I don't think is farfetched given the 'collective' nature of the noun), as in 'a brood of thirty head(s)'. A 'genitive of description' sounds good to me.
  19. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    OK, so you do take triginta with capitum.
  20. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    Hm ... that sounds better than how I understood it.

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