I'll either find a way or make one

By Gsedge1, in 'English to Latin Translation', Dec 11, 2010.

  1. archer111 New Member

    Thanks! It is indeed a gyrfalcon! :)
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Hannibal actually certainly never said those words himself, it is a myth, and I don't know where it comes from exactly.

    All I know is that aut viam inveniam aut faciam is a more exact translation of "I shall either find a way or make one" than with only one aut. ;)

    And the sentence like this is quite popular and well-known, and correct.
  3. archer111 New Member

    Sorry, I should have asked this in my original post but I just remembered it now. How would you write it in the imperative? And how would you write it when joined with "Time flies"?

    So far, I've found separate translations for the sayings.
    Time flies = tempus fugit
    Either find a way or make one = aut viam inveniamus aut faciamus.

    So how would you string them together to say:
    Time flies so either find a way or make one!
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Tempus fugit, ergo aut viam inveni aut fac! (Imperative to one person.)

    Aut viam inveniamus aut faciamus means "let us either find a way or make one".
  5. archer111 New Member


    Oops, yahoo answers fail. Thanks for the correction!
    By the way, does that phrase sound okay to you? Stylistically? Does it carry the same sort of weight as the original more well-known quote? Or does it lose a lot of its "umph"? The reason I'm asking is because I was thinking of getting it engraved on a clock that I'm giving to a friend of mine (for his graduation). Hence the "time flies" part....as an [probably corny] attempt to be clever. What do y'all think?
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    It seems ok to me; it carries the same idea of determination, except that it's an order to have that determination, instead of an affirmation that you have it. Now, on a purely "musical" level, sure that it loses the -am alliteration of the original, aut viam inveniam aut faciam, which sounds especially good to me.

    Now if it's for a gift to a friend, in the context you describe it probably makes more sense to address him, telling him to either find a way or make one than to say "I shall either find a way or make one" (if it were for a t-shirt he would wear, it may have been different... :p).
    Last edited by Pacis puella, May 15, 2013
  7. TRL New Member

    Location:
    Manassas, Virginia
    what about this version:
    aut viam inveniam aut faciam tibi. What significance does the tibi part hold. And should it be included for tattoo purposes?
  8. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    It means "I'll either find a way or make one for you".
  9. TRL New Member

    Location:
    Manassas, Virginia
    Ok super...Thanx!
  10. Abbatiſſæ Scriptor Senex

    • Civis Illustris
    I would keep the first 'aut'.
    'aut... aut...': 'either... or...'

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