Infinitives of purpose

By Cinefactus, in 'Latin Grammar Questions', Oct 30, 2018.

  1. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    I have been encountering some infinitives of purpose in Plautus and have been glossing over them, but I am wondering if I am missing something.

    quae illaec ōrātiōst? cessō ego hās cōnsōlārī?

    Is this a feature of Early Latin, or is there more to it?
  2. AoM nulli numeri

    • Civis Illustris
    Definitely a thing in early writers, but here it's just going with cesso, right?
  3. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Yes, this is just going with cesso.
    Infinitives of purpose also appear occasionally in poetry, e.g. Non nos aut ferro Libycos populare Penatis / venimus...

    I believe Allen and Greenough's definition of inf. of purpose includes things like tantum habeo polliceri and ut Iovi bibere ministraret, both from Cicero. I also believe that they count consuetus bellare as an example of an inf. of purpose (at least, it's come up at Certamen practice with inf. of purpose being the answer), though I can't fathom why.
    Callaina likes this.
  4. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    Thanks :) I didn't realise cesso took an infinitive :(

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