intellegite facem tribulantis

By npiagentini, in 'Latin to English Translation', Jul 9, 2019.

  1. npiagentini New Member

    Hello,
    I work in Cybersecurity and one of the organizations I work with has this phrase as part of their unit "insignia" Google tells me it has something to do with a torch foe, which makes no sense! I was hoping to get a better translation of it. For context they are a team that analyzes emerging threat actors...

    Thanks in advance!

    Nick
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Hello,

    Literally, it could translate to "understand the torch of the oppressor". That doesn't make a great deal of sense at first sight, but in some contexts the word for "torch" can mean figuratively an incitement or motive and my guess is that's what they were going for here: "understand the motive(s) of the oppressor". If that was indeed their intent, I'm not sure it's very lucid Latin but it's grammatically correct and makes sense at least theoretically.
  3. npiagentini New Member

    Thank you! That makes sense, and it is also good to know that there are no Latin scholars in that team. That was also incredibly fast and helpful. if only every message board I posted to was up to these standards!

    Have a great day!
    Gregorius Textor likes this.
  4. Laurentius Weebus Maximus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    I wonder if they could have just mispelled faciem which means face.
    Gregorius Textor likes this.
  5. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    The Douay-Rheims translates ante faciem tribulantis literally as "before the face of the oppressor" but the KJV, which was translated from the original Hebrew rather than from the Latin, has "before the enemy".

    So now I wonder if the intent of whoever created the motto wasn't simply something like "understand/know the enemy", and if they didn't leave the translation to Google Translate, which is known, among other messing-ups, to misapply quotes from Latin texts in whose official English version there's some word in common with what it's being asked to translate.
    Gregorius Textor likes this.
  7. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I'm almost sure that's it. It's so typical.

    Google Translate or some similar machine needed to translate "the enemy", saw in its database that the English KJV had "the enemy" where the Latin Vulgate had faciem tribulantis, and therefore decided faciem tribulantis was an appropriate translation for "the enemy" (which it isn't).

    Then, someone just made a typo in the process of transcription and the i of faciem was lost.
    Issacus Divus and Bitmap like this.
  8. Issacus Divus Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    Always takes from the Vulgate.
    For me, it translated "and I saw a ladder" as "Et vidi in somnis scalam."
    Gregorius Textor and Pacifica like this.
  9. Issacus Divus Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    *In fact, it translated "ladder" as somnis scalam just now :D
    Gregorius Textor and Pacifica like this.
  10. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    :hysteric:
  11. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Earlier, however, I tried a few variations on "know/understand the/your enemy" and it never gave me intellegite faciem tribulantis. But its translations are known to change, as well, so it could have produced that translation years ago and give a different one now. Or perhaps it would still give it to me if I fed it the English phrase with the right capitalization — for, yes, it's also known to give dramatically different translations depending on whether you capitalize some words. Or yet again the OP's phrase may have come from another machine translator — though Google Translate still seems the most likely culprit, being the most widely used.
  12. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Not from the Vulgate, but... it translates "Know the Enemy" as Nosce inimicum Glossarium, which is rather funny. Like, that GT-style random kind of funny.
    Dantius and Issacus Divus like this.
  13. Issacus Divus Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    For all I know, maybe they did want "understand the face of the oppressor", because Google gives intellegite faciem tribulantis. Then again, as you said, there are other factors, so who knows.
    Pacifica likes this.
  14. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Understand the Enemy = Intellegite nunc antichristi.

    That is likely to come from the Vulgate.
    Issacus Divus likes this.
  15. Issacus Divus Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    "I don't understand why people use Google Translate"= Qui usi sunt, non intellego cur Google Translate.
  16. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I use it to have a good laugh = Ego uti risu bonum habere.
  17. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Hmm... How likely is "understand the face of the oppressor" to spring to a motto-maker's mind? You never know, I guess; maybe this motto-maker was a poet.

    I was thinking maybe "the profile of the enemy" was more likely, but GT doesn't give me faciem tribulantis for that (in fact, it leaves the word "profile" in English, when it doesn't omit it altogether — I tried a few variant wordings).
  18. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Now, I guess a human origin for the translation is still possible. Maybe they asked a human translator for something like "understand the profile of the enemy" and the human translator, being faced with a word ("profile") that had no real Latin equivalent, went for an approximation and thought it would be fun to include a Vulgate quote in there.
    Gregorius Textor likes this.
  19. Issacus Divus Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    Maybe it was the demonking of all the machines, InterTran.
  20. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Unlikely. Intertran uses pretty much only the lemma forms, so intellegite for instance would have been intellego — or, in the worst case, it would have intellego intellexi intellectus, because it sometimes gives you all the principal parts of verbs and both the nom. and gen. of nouns.

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