1. Westcott Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    In the Aeneid, when Laocoon sees the Trojan Horse, he says quidquid id est, timeo Danaos et dona ferentis - whatever it is, I fear the Greeks, albeit bearing gifts. If quidquid = whatever, quid = what. So it looks to me as though Vergil vouches for the form est quid id est.
  2. Imber Ranae Ranunculus Iracundus

    • Civis Illustris
    quid is interrogative rather than relative, though, unlike quidquid.
  3. veritas aequitas New Member

    Location:
    canada

    that's another argument cuz from what i found online (not here): veritas aequitas = truth and justice
    whereas veritas et aequitas = truth and equity
    so i have the first cuz of the justice part too :)
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    The only difference between the two is et which means "and". It doesn't affect the meaning of the separate words. "Equity" and "justice" are both possible translations for aequitas.
  5. veritas aequitas New Member

    Location:
    canada

    ah i see. i bow to you and your expertise.
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Honestly, it doesn't require an enormous expertise to know that. ;)
  7. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    It Is What It Is, in English, is a short-priced favourite for the 16.40 at Bangor today. It may win, but there's no value in it, and it's a poor race. Foot The Bill each way at 12/1 looks more interesting.
  8. Trond Johnsen New Member

    A mix of latin and english.

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