It's going to take awhile before everything is done.

By LenCabral, in 'English to Latin Translation', Mar 2, 2019.

  1. LenCabral Member

    Location:
    Newark DE
    Hi everyone,

    I am wondering how to translate something like "it's going to take a while" in the construction above. "dego" can be used for time passing, but in the sense like "I pass the time doing..." Here's my attempt, I'm not sure if this is grammatical or acceptable.

    multum tempus degetur antequam omnia facta sint.

    Thanks!
  2. syntaxianus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Aliquid temporis requiretur...

    Some time will be needed...

    antequam opus omnino confectum sit.

    before the work has been entirely completed.
  3. LenCabral Member

    Location:
    Newark DE
    Thanks! Do you think "omnia facta sint" from my original is not acceptable? If so, can you explain why? (just trying to get better) Would "confecta sint" work?
  4. syntaxianus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Your words seem quite acceptable to me. Conficere has a stronger air of finality..."finish up."
  5. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada

    Why the subjunctive?
  6. LenCabral Member

    Location:
    Newark DE
    My understanding is that antequam + future has to be subjunctive. In this case, the passage is talking about a future completion, thus, subjunctive.
  7. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    Huh, interesting; that sounds vaguely familiar but I wasn't fully aware of it. According to L&S, it can appear with future perfect, though rarely; but I don't think that makes too much sense here anyway.
  8. LenCabral Member

    Location:
    Newark DE
  9. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    Hmmm, but there it says the subjunctive is rare when referring to future time.

    Tagging Pacifica as no doubt she will be able to straighten this out!
  10. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    I wonder if dum would actually be more idiomatic ("until everything is done").
  11. syntaxianus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    To me it seemed to make sense to use the subjunctive for something that was not a fact and might not ever be a fact. But it is possible that the typical classical usage would be the indicative.
  12. LenCabral Member

    Location:
    Newark DE
    valde hoc velim ante quam proficiscare amanter, ut soles, diligenterque conficias.

    I should be very glad if you would settle this before you leave Rome, with your usual kindness and exactness.

    This example is from Cicero; Letters to Atticus Book 2, Num. 4. Here he uses proficiscare and conficias, which are subjunctive.
  13. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    I agree with Dantius that dum feels more appropriate here (though maybe antequam isn't impossible either).
  14. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    minor correction: this isn't part of the antequam clause. The point of your citation still stands though.

    But I'm leaning more and more towards using dum.
  15. syntaxianus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Since ante belli finem is a classical formulation, ante operis finem would also be possible. Ante opus confectum seems possible to me as well. People that used ab urbe condita might even find it rather normal.

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