Latin Mention Julius Caesar

By J.M, in 'General Latin Chat (English)', Feb 21, 2019.

  1. J.M Active Member

    Greetings to all Latin d members,

    Today, after having discussed some facts about the Roman Empire and Julius Caesar we asked ourselves what Caesars last words/phrases were (in Latin) according to the Wikipedia article regarding Julius's Caesar's last words (to Brutus) were; Et tu Brutus? - you too Brutus? But as Wikipedia articles are not reliable,I decided to ask you guys about this so that I can be sure of It,

    Thank you as always,

    J.M
  2. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    The story is reported by Suetonius in Divus Iulius Cap. 82
    Atque ita tribus et viginti plagis confossus est uno modo ad primum ictum gemitu sine voce edito, etsi tradiderunt quidam Marco Bruto irruenti dixisse: καὶ σὺ τέκνον;
    J.M likes this.
  3. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    Which wikipedia article did you look at (i.e. in which language?)?

    The English one on Julius Caesar at least seems to get the vocative right:
    Et tu, Brute?

    It's been a while since I read Caesar's vita, but I'm not sure if the Latin expression "et tu, Brute?" (or sometimes even "et tu, Brute fili", I think) is actually mentioned anywhere. I only remember an account of his last words in Suetonius, where Caesar is said to have uttered the Greek words "kai sy, teknon" ("you too, my child?"). A quick search on the internet has not helped me find any original sources of the "et tu, Brute" version, either.

    Maybe I'm mixing this up ... I'm pretty sure there are differing accounts on his winged words "let the die be cast" - as to whether they were spoken in Greek or in Latin - but there may not be different (original) accounts on his last words.
    J.M likes this.
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    That is, according to Suetonius, his last words were Greek, not Latin, and meant "You too, my child?" That has often been translated to Latin as Tu quoque, fili?

    Et tu Brutus isn't optimal Latin, because Brutus should normally be in the vocative, Brute.

    The phrase Et tu, Brute is used by Shakespeare in his play Julius Caesar:
    Edit: Bitmap and I simulposted. I wrote my post after reading only Cinefactus's.
    Last edited by Pacifica, Feb 21, 2019
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  5. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena

    I hadn't even read Cinefactus's post, but your contributions clear up what I seemed to remember :)
    J.M likes this.
  6. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Lamun Dardanian has delivered the last word on this.

    As we all know, the old Greek language doesn't have anything to do with a modern Greek language and no Greeks can understand the old one. The only people who do understand it are Albanians. The etymology of the word KAI SU TEKNON (Kai s'u te knon)means Cry like you are singing. Kai -Cray SU- like you Te`knon- singing Shakespeare was in Albania a few times and he maybe understood the Albanian language.

    Lamun Dardanian, Kosova Albania

    https://www.theguardian.com/notesandqueries/query/0,5753,-1156,00.html
    J.M and Bitmap like this.
  7. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    :crazy:
    J.M likes this.
  8. J.M Active Member

    Thank you all for your time and consideration on this topic,
    J.M

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