King of the Wolves or King (Emperor) of the Wolf Empire

By AL Villalobos, in 'Fantasy & Sci Fi Projects', Jun 12, 2019.

  1. AL Villalobos New Member

    Greeting All,

    I'm currently working on a work of fiction based on an idea from Kipling's Jungle Book and the Disney cartoon as well.
    In Kipling's work, The monkeys of the forest have a human-like society and call themselves the Bandar-log. In the Disney cartoon, the Bandar-log have a King- King Louie, who is actually an Orangutan.

    In my fictional world, it was discovered in ancient times that wolves have a similar society, and it still exists today. This knowledge has been lost in modern times, and a character discovers an ancient mural in Latin depicting the leader of the wolves. Still working on what this mural says, exactly, but I'm certain the Head Wolf's title is prominently featured.

    So what is this animals's title as the supreme leader of all wolves everywhere?
    Would this society of wolves around the world have been called a Luperium? (Lupus + Imperium)
    Would he be Rex Luperium? Rex omnia Lupi?

    All suggestions welcome - your creativity would be appreciated!

    Many thanks

    AL- new guy
  2. Issacus Divus Sunu Reordcyningas

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    You made a neologism!
    If we use that, it should be Rex Luperii.
    Classical Latin would give Rex omnium luporum.
  3. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Hello,

    A few suggestions:

    King of the wolves = rex luporum.
    Emperor/commander of the wolves = imperator luporum.
    King of the wolf empire = rex imperi lupini.
    Emperor/commander of the wolf empire = imperator imperi lupini.

    Luperium isn't a word, but maybe you can use it if your intent is to be humorous rather than linguistically rigorous. In the above, it would need to take the form luperi.

    Neither Rex Luperium nor Rex omnia Lupi is a grammatically coherent phrase.
  4. Issacus Divus Sunu Reordcyningas

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    I like luperium.
  5. scrabulista Consul

    • Consul
    Location:
    Tennessee
  6. Issacus Divus Sunu Reordcyningas

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    Lupirex!
  7. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    It's a bit weird.
  8. Issacus Divus Sunu Reordcyningas

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    This whole thing could be semi-humourous.
  9. AL Villalobos New Member

    Pacifica noted:

    "Luperium isn't a word, but maybe you can use it if your intent is to be humorous rather than linguistically rigorous. In the above, it would need to take the form luperi."

    Well, of course it isnt a word. In my original post I said this would be used in a work of fiction in a version of the Roman Empire that did not exist. In that alternate history, where a wolf empire did exist , what word would the Romans have coined to describe it? How would these fictional Romans have described the ruler of the wolves, as if here were a human King or emperor of a far off land?

    Thats what I was trying to ask.

    So, COULD "Luperium" be a grammatically correct Latin neologism for the above situation?

    As Issacus Divusand Pacifica note - King of the wolves = rex luporum.
    Emperor/commander of the wolves = imperator luporum.

    is "Luporum " refrerring to just "Wolves" (simply plural, more than one wolf) or a more expansive and inclusive 'Wolfdom" as in all the wolves in the world and their society

    Thanks again guys-- I'm digging these comments!
  10. Issacus Divus Sunu Reordcyningas

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    Good questions;

    1. Nothing wrong with Luperium. I dig it!

    2. Luporum just means "of the wolves". That's why I gave rex omnium luporum, king of all wolves.
  11. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    The Romans would usually have said something along the lines of what I suggested.

    The luperium coinage isn't coherent with usual word-formation rules. Now, I can't swear some Roman joker couldn't have coined it anyway.

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