1. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    That's correct.

    Note that if you wanted to produce a translation that reflected the emphasis of the original more accurately, you could turn the construction into the passive and say "In ancient times, Egypt was ruled by pharaohs". This translation is more suitable in a situation where Egypt is the theme of the sentence, as it clearly is in the Latin by Aegyptum coming first.

    Your translation is fine at this stage because you're still at a level where you have to consolidate your understanding of what is the subject and what is the object etc., but I'm saying this so you can perhaps keep it in a back-corner of your brain for the future: word order conveys nuances that are sometimes best rendered by an at-first-sight-less-literal translation.
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Translate:

    In ancient times, the Roman people elected two consuls every year.
  3. R. Seltza Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Terra Solis Lapsi
    “In ancient times, the Roman people elected two consuls every year.”

    In – Preposition – Indeclinable – In (With Ablative PCR)
    Ancient – Adjective – Must Agree With “Times” – Also Falls Under PCR – Antiquis
    Times – Plural Noun – Prepositional Noun – Falls Under Ablative PCR - Temporibus
    ,
    The – Definite Article – Becomes a Magically Implied Ghost in Latin, lol
    Roman – Adjective – Must Agree With “People” - Romanus
    People – Singular Noun (Sentence Subject) – Nominative Case – Populus
    Elected – Transitive Verb – 3rd Person Active Indicative – Perfect - Elegit
    Two – Number – Acts as an Adjective – Must Agree With “Consuls” - Duo
    Consuls – Plural Noun (Direct Object) – Accusative Case – Consilia
    Every – (In This Case) Adjective – Must Agree With “Year” - Omnis
    Year – Singular Noun - Annus

    So the translation would be in temporibus anitiquis, populus romanus consilia duo elegit annus omnis.

    I know I probably did something pretty wrong with “every year”. I wasn’t sure about that phrase’s part of speech & the inflection is probably wrong too.
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    - "Time at which" is usually expressed by the ablative alone, without preposition, so you don't need the in before temporibus antiquis.

    - Consilium can mean, among other things, "advice" or "counsel", not "consul". "Consul" is, well, consul (gen. consulis), masc.

    - The imperfect would be more likely than the perfect, because the sentence is about a habitual action in the past.

    - Omnis annus is in the wrong case. The nominative is used for the subject of a verb. Is omnis annus the subject, i.e. what elected the consuls? No, so it has nothing to do in the nominative. "Every year", like "in ancient times", denotes the "time at which" the action happened, so the ablative omni anno would be grammatically correct. However, it wouldn't be very idiomatic; the usual way of saying "every year" is quotannis.
  5. R. Seltza Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Terra Solis Lapsi
    Doesn't this also mean "every month" as well as "every year"?
  6. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    No. quot mensibus appears to be attested for "every month", but it's rare. quotannis (or quot annis) just means "every year".
  7. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Translate next:

    Julius gave his girlfriend an expensive ring.
  8. R. Seltza Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Terra Solis Lapsi
    So the actual translation would really be temporibus anitiquis, populus romanus consules duo elegit quotannis.
  9. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    So better eligebat than elegit. For the rest, yes.
  10. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Antiquis.
  11. R. Seltza Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Terra Solis Lapsi
    “Julius gave his girlfriend an expensive ring.”

    Julius – A Guy’s Name – Singular Noun (Sentence Subject) – Nominative Case - Julius
    Gave – 3rd Person Singular Active Indicative Verb - Perfect Tense - Dedit
    His – Singular Possessive Pronoun – Describes Julius, Who’s a Guy, So Masculine – Case Must Still Agree With Object - Suo
    Girlfriend – Singular Noun – Indirect Object – Dative Case - Amatrici
    An – Indefinite Article – (Disappears & Becomes Magically Implied)
    Expensive – Adjective – Must Agree With “Ring” – Sumptuosum
    Ring – Singular Noun (Sentence Object) – Accusative Case - Anulum

    So, the translation would be Juilus anulum sumptuosum dedit amatrici suo.
  12. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Suus, like meus, tuus, noster and vester, is an adjective that agrees with the thing possessed in gender, number and case. So here it should be suae.

    Well done on not mixing up the direct and indirect objects.

    Translate:

    Marce, Marce, veni cito: Iulius gladio tuo sese interficere vult.
  13. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    :eek:
  14. R. Seltza Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Terra Solis Lapsi
    So suus isn’t actually represented in accordance to the gender of the person it’s referring to?

    Marce, Marce, veni cito: Iulius gladio tuo sese interficere vult.”

    Marce – Singular Noun (A Guy’s Name) – Vocative Case – “Marcus”
    ,
    Marce – See Above
    ,
    Veni – 2nd Person Present Imperative – Singular – “Come”
    Cito – Adverb – Indeclinable – “Quickly/Fast”
    : (Did you mean to use “;” or even "!" instead of “:”?)

    Julius – Singular Noun (Another Guy’s Name) – Nominative Case – “Julius” (Of Course)
    Gladio – Singular Noun – Ablative – “By/With Sword”
    Tuo – Possessive Pronoun – Ablative – “By Your”
    Sese – Reflexive Pronoun – Singular – Accusative - “Himself”
    Interficere – Present Active Infinitive Verb – “To Kill”
    Vult – 3rd Person Singular Present Active Indicative Verb – “Wishes”

    “Marcus, Marcus, come quickly(;/!) Julius wishes to kill himself by/with your sword.”
  15. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Screen Shot 2019-02-10 at 12.41.38 AM.png
    The second part explains why Marcus should come quickly.
  16. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Anyway, your translation is otherwise correct.
  17. R. Seltza Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Terra Solis Lapsi
    What source is that partial screenshot from?
  18. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    The first result when you google "use of colon". But every result, including from the MLA style center and Oxford Dictionaries, says something similar.

    But also, it seems to me that traditional punctuation for Latin texts uses colons a lot more than we do in English. Not sure why, but it happens.
  19. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Translate:

    The monkey will break the nut with a stone.
  20. R. Seltza Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Terra Solis Lapsi
    “The monkey will break the nut with a stone.”

    The – Definite Article – (Becomes a Magically Implied Ghost)
    Monkey – Singular Noun (Sentence Subject) – Nominative Case - Simius
    Will – Indicates Future Tense For a Verb– Follows Below ↓
    Break – 3rd Person Singular Active Indicative Verb – Future Tense - Dirumpet
    The – Another Definite Article – (Becomes a Magically Implied Ghost)
    Nut – Singular Noun (Sentence Object) – Accusative Case - Nucem
    With – Preposition – Ablative of Means (So This Just Disappears)
    A – Indefinite Article - (Becomes a Magically Implied Ghost)
    Stone – Prepositional Object – Singular Noun – Ablative Case – Saxo

    Simius nucem saxo dirumpet.

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