Laudate omnes gentes laudate Magnificat en secula Et anima mea laudate Magnificat en secula

By ryokan, in 'Latin to English Translation', Aug 30, 2013.

  1. ryokan New Member

    One of my favorite songs from the 90's by Ace Of Base called Happy Nation has the following phrase in Latin:

    "Laudate omnes gentes laudate
    Magnificat en secula
    Et anima mea laudate
    Magnificat en secuala".

    Is the spelling correct and how would you translate it correctly?
    I've seen various attempts to use google but that always ends up ugly ;)

    Cheers,
    /Ryokan
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Hello,

    I have found lyrics and what they say it means on the net:

    Laudate omnes gentes laudate
    Magnificat in secula
    Et anima mea laudate
    Magnificat in secula
    (praise, all people praise)
    (the greatest in all time)
    (and praise my soul)
    (the greatest in all time)

    But actually only the first line means what they say.

    In fact it could translate as:

    Praise, all peoples, praise
    My soul too glorifies in (all) centuries,
    Praise, it glorifies in centuries.
    Last edited by Pacis puella, Aug 30, 2013
  3. ryokan New Member

    I was told that it should appear in some form in Catholic Liturgy?
    But there the form should be:

    "Praise, all people praise God
    The Greatest in all time
    And my soul too glorifies
    The Greatest in all time".

    Is this a closer translation or is God here implied in the Liturgy?

    /Ryokan
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Yes, they have taken bits from the liturgy. The magnificat anima mea (dominum, normally) comes from a canticle.

    They certainly picked up the rest in other parts of liturgy, I don't know which ones, and mingled them.

    But nothing is actually saying "the greatest in all times" nor "god" in their lyrics.
  5. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Laudate omnes gentes comes from the Psalms.

    Edit: Well, I don't find the phrase in the Vulgate. Maybe it's taken from an earlier version of the Bible (Vetus Latina).
    Last edited by Pacis puella, Aug 30, 2013
  6. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo

    I think this is a bit of a stretch.

    The only occurrence of magnificat in the Vulgate is Luke 1:40 et ait Maria magnificat anima mea Dominum

    I suspect that the missing noun is the anima mea from the third line. Something like:
    My soul extols (the Lord) always
  7. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Yes, I said their translation wasn't right and that nothing was saying "the greatest in all times".
  8. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    Ninja'd ;)
    laudete omnes gentes probably comes from
    Psalms 117:1: laudate Dominum omnes gentes conlaudate eum universi populi
  9. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Oh, so it is in the Vulgate. I didn't find it just because I searched for laudate omnes gentes... while dominum was in between.

    So:

    - Magnificat anima mea, "my sould extols" comes from the canticle Magnificat I've linked to (and normally there is domnium/"the lord" as object).

    - Laudate omnes gentes, "praise, all peoples" (again normally dominum/"the Lord"), comes from the psalms.

    - In secula, "in centuries" (or "for all times" if you will) is a pretty common expression probably found about everywhere in liturgy.

    And they have made a soup of all that, while omitting dominum/"the lord".
  10. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    I think in secula is short for in secula seculorum which is an imitation of a Hebrew expression meaning forever.

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