Mastering the art of thought

By Alan, in 'English to Latin Translation', Aug 15, 2019.

  1. Alan New Member

    Hi all and thanks in advance.
    I am interested in the translation of the phrase above to be used as a description of achieving the ability to master and control the brain's thoughts (not thinking which is the process but the result of the process of thinking).
    It would be of great help as I clearly do not want to rely on the automated translations and I want the translation to be grammatically correct.
    The choice of using Latin for this phrase is due to the respect to the wealth of wisdom distributed in Latin and the "sound" of Latin in such contexts.
    Thanks,
    Alan.
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Hi,

    I would suggest perdiscere artem cogitationis.

    That's if "mastering" here means the action of mastering, as opposed to being a word describing someone as "mastering", which would translate differently. Your explanations seemed to me to suggest that you meant the action, but I'm still letting you know about this in case I was wrong.
  3. LCF a.k.a. Lucifer

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Apud Inferos
    perficere artem cogitandi

    "art of thought" conveys more of an action of thinking rather then the final product of thinking - thoughts .
  4. LCF a.k.a. Lucifer

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Apud Inferos

    I should have read this...
  5. Alan New Member

    Thanks Pacifica and LCF!
    As I have no ability to validate this is actually the exact translation I needed, I will clarify the use of mastering.
    Mastering here is used to describe the highest level of ability. A description of efficacy in controlling the art of thought.
    Is the suggested translation by Pacifica has this meaning?
    Thanks again, so lovely to have enthusiasts who help when needed.
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Perdiscere means to learn thoroughly.

    If what you mean by "mastering" is more like what happens after you've learned it thoroughly, i.e. being an expert, then I suppose you could say something like perite exercere artem cogitationis ("skillfully/expertly exercising the art of thought") or even in the superlative peritissime exercere artem cogitationis ("most expertly...").
    Bitmap likes this.
  7. Issacus Divus Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    So that’s the verb? Perdiscere? Alright.
  8. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    What do you mean?
  9. Issacus Divus Well-Known Member

    Location:
    Gæmleflodland
    I was looking for a verb that could translate to “to master”.
  10. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Ah. Well, yes, I think perdiscere can be a good fit in many cases.
  11. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    magistrum fieri :p
  12. Alan New Member

    Thanks again Pacifica, that was a comprehensive explanation. I do need to use perdiscere in what I want to convey.
    So great to see a live discussion like this that promotes knowledge sharing.
    Great community, I am very grateful.
  13. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    You're welcome. Thanks for your kind words.

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