1. Subcontrary New Member

    Here is the culprit sentence, written by a Lutheran theologian:

    "Singularia vero exempla videre sunt apud Megalandrum nostrum LUTHERUM in Colloqu. Commens."

    Which I think basically means "But unusual examples to see are in a work of our *great guy* Luther, Table Talk." Has anybody any information on this word? I'm quite confident as to its general sense, but its provenance is most baffling!
  2. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Seems like Greek μέγας (big) + ἀνήρ (man)
  3. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Yep. See: http://ducange.enc.sorbonne.fr/MEGALANDER

    "Great man" is probably a better translation (in a more suitable register) than "great guy".

    Singularia vero exempla videre sunt strikes me as an unusual construction. It sounds to me as if videre sunt = "are to be seen", but that isn't normal Latin. It sounds like French, actually, sont à voir (literally "are to see" but meaning "are to be seen").
  4. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    I would expect "videre est" in the sense of "it is possible to see".
  5. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Yes, that would be more normal.
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium

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