Love My Commitment To You

By JimLT, in 'English to Latin Translation', Dec 4, 2018.

  1. JimLT New Member

    Hi there, I was wondering if there's a way to phrase the above "My Commitment To Us" in 15 characters or less. This is in the context of love and assurance, with the author indicating his/her commitment and giving his/her all to making the relationship work. Appreciate any help here :)

    Edit: oops, title is meant to say "My Commitment To Us"
  2. Hemo Rusticus The Lizard King

    • Civis Illustris
    < 15 characters is a bit of a tall order. It'll have to be elliptical.

    Maybe:

    PROSIM EGO NOBIS (May I do good for us)
    or simply
    NOBIS EGOMET (I for us)

    Spaces aren't necessary, if you're really strapped.
  3. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    Adsum nobis ("I am here for us") might work as well, though it (like the above suggestions) sounds a bit odd.

    Honestly, this isn't the sort of thing a Roman would say, which is why I avoided the thread before now. ;)
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    What would a Roman say?

    I'm under the impression it might involve fides, but anything involving "us" rather than "you" feels a bit doubtful. Maybe "our love" or such would work, but we'd quickly be going over the 15 characters.
  5. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I'm tempted to suggest fidem servabo, "I will keep my commitment", but obviously it's a loose adaptation.
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Another idea:

    Amorem colam = I will cultivate (our) love.

    This could be ambiguous, though, but the character limit won't let me include nostrum...
  7. JimLT New Member

    Thanks for the fantastic suggestions so far, Hemo, Callaina and Pacifica! I am very inclined towards fidem servabo or adsum nobis, as they have the gumption and resolve I seek (at least from my very little understanding of Latin). It's only the relationship intimacy part that I'm a bit unsure of. In your opinions, which has a softer touch to it?
  8. syntaxianus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    omnino sponsus

    = utterly pledged / committed
    J.M likes this.
  9. syntaxianus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    A very concise solution:

    Adero

    = "I'll be there"

    It carries the connotation it can carry in English: You can count on me.

    L&S on adsum : E. To be present with one's aid or support; to stand by, to assist, aid, help, protect, defend, sustain
    J.M and Hemo Rusticus like this.
  10. JimLT New Member

    Awesome! So just one word "adero" will do?
  11. Hemo Rusticus The Lizard King

    • Civis Illustris
    Yessir, that one word will do you just fine. Our friend syntaxianus knocked it out of the park.
  12. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    I also think adero would work very well.
  13. JimLT New Member

    Thanks so much everybody! Just one more question, if I want to direct this message at someone, can I say "Adero, <name>" where <name> is the person that I am promising my commitment to? Or should it be "Adero <name>" without the comma?
  14. syntaxianus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA

    The comma is optional. Ancients did not use that punctuation mark.
  15. JimLT New Member

    Got it. Thank you so much for your help syntaxianus, Callaina, Hemo and Pacifica! :)

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