1. Matthaeus Vemortuicida strenuus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Varsovia
    Re: A small translation

    I think we have all forgotten what the original poster's intent was, anyway. Quin ad propositum revertamur?
  2. MuffinMan New Member

    Re: A small translation

    The original poster got what he wanted. And he is eternally grateful to all who helped him. Thanks a lot guys. I don't know if you'll understand, but this actually meant a lot to me.
  3. Matthaeus Vemortuicida strenuus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Varsovia
    Re: A small translation

    I'm glad we helped you out! :D
  4. thejeffk New Member

    Hi I have been looking around for a translation of "Never Give Up" but keep gettin multiple translations. If it matters, I am looking for a translation that signifies "persistence","perseverance", "press on"... thank you
  5. Imprecator Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Colchis
    Numquam recede for singular, numquam recedite for plural.
  6. Nikolaos schmikolaos

    • Censor
    Shouldn't a negative imperative be Noli[te] umquam recedere instead?
  7. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    Yes, negated imperatives are either done with noli + inf. or a prohibitive subjunctive (ne umquam recesseris)
  8. thejeffk New Member

    Im sorry, excuse my ignorance... So which one is correct? Thank you very much.
  9. Nikolaos schmikolaos

    • Censor
    Addressing an individual, using the words chosen by Imprecator:

    Noli umquam recedere
    or
    Ne umquam recesseris

    To a group of two or more (such as, perhaps, the world in general):

    Nolite umquam recedere
    or
    Ne umquam recesseritis

    Wait for others to comment on my answer, first.
  10. Imprecator Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Colchis
    Indeed- replace numquam with noli/nolite.
  11. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    then add umquam again and turn recede into an infinitive :)
  12. Crg2010 New Member

    Ne Umquam Desperaveris

    Hi

    I would really like some help in regards to correct translation " Ne Umquam Desperaveris " meaning "To Never Give Up" as in a singular.

    I want this tattoed just below my neck after some interesting life experiences and would like to no if this is correct translation. If so what would be the correct voicing as if someone asked me how to pronouce it in latin.

    Thank you for you time in advance :)

    Regards
  13. Tacitus Arctous Active Member

    Location:
    Finnia, Helsinki
    Re: Ne Umquam Desperaveris

    It means "never give up" in the singular, it is translated as the imperative.
  14. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
  15. solminja New Member

    I feel really stupid because this is the same question again! But i am getting a tattoo soon and i don´t understand :oops: .
    Is all of these correct or not?

    Ne Umquam Desperaveris
    Ne umquam succubueris
    Ne umquam succumbas
    Numquam spem depone
    Noli umquam succumbere
    numquam cesseri
    Numquam succubueritis
    numquam erraveris
    I´m really sorry.
    I think i want it in singular, and if everyone of the obove is right. Wich one sounds best?
    One more question. how do you translate " Hearts heal and Wings grow back (again)"?

    I would be sooooo happy if someone explained it to me :)<3
  16. Nikolaos schmikolaos

    • Censor
    Correct:
    Ne umquam desperaveris
    Ne umquam succubueris
    Noli umquam succumbere
    Numquam succubueritis

    The last one above is addressed to several people instead of just one, so I would go with one of the others)

    Ungrammatical:

    Ne umquam succumbas
    Numquam spem depone
    numquam cesseri

    Grammatical, but wrong meaning:
    Numquam erraveris ("Never err")

    That's up to you :)

    Start a new thread for that - I could try to translate it here, but it might go unnoticed and uncorrected by our better Latinists ;)
  17. solminja New Member

    Can you change Ne to Noli in Ne umquam desperaveris ? I think Noli sounds more beautiful ;P
    I have also made a new thread now :)
  18. scrabulista Consul

    • Consul
    Location:
    Tennessee
    Noli umquam desperare.
  19. Corey Simmons New Member

    If it was one speaking in a command to themselves what would the conjugation be? I am inclined to believe it would be Numquam cede or Numquam succumbe on the suggestion of an old teacher. Is this correct?
  20. socratidion Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    London
    I think the point of all the discussion is that one should avoid using negatives with imperatives. To do negative commands, you are encouraged to use a (usually perfect) subjunctive, or the circumlocution 'noli/nolite' with an infinitive. So either 'numquam cesseris', or 'noli umquam cedere'.

    That's a necessary simplification, but the exceptions to the rule are controversial and have been debated on this forum.

    As a matter of style, I've mentioned elsewhere that I think English is very comfortable with the word 'never' in this sort of command, but in Latin 'numquam' trips less happily off the tongue. The same sentiment can be expressed as 'ne cesseris', and if the 'never' is that important, there might be more sonorous alternatives, such as 'nullo tempore vitae' etc.

    But that's an unnecessary complication, and you can ignore it if you wish.

    PS I don't think it makes any difference if you are addressing the command to yourself. By doing so, you make yourself into your own addressee, and in that role you are second person singular.

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