Never Retreat Never Surrender

By IBBO, in 'English to Latin Translation', May 8, 2011.

  1. IBBO New Member

    Hi,

    Im hoping you may be able to help me please?

    I am trying to get a translation of a phrase into Latin

    The Phrase is:

    Never Retreat
    Never Surrender

    From looking on the internet so far i have come across the following:

    Nunquam Regressus
    Nunquam Trado

    Does this read right?

    The meaning i would think is quite simple. But essentially i want it to mean Never Surrender, Retreat or Give Up

    Does it read right as it is?

    Many Thanks for your help in advance

    Regards

    Phil
  2. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Saxonia
    do you want these phrases to be imperatives?
  3. IBBO New Member

    Hi,

    I am trying to get this phrase translated and really dont have much time so any help would be much appreciated

    I have Nunquam Regressus Nunquam Trado

    Is this right?

    Also can somebody explain what is the difference between Nunquam and Numquam?

    Which would be better used in my translation?

    Many Thanks

    Phil
  4. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Saxonia
    do you want these phrases to be imperatives?
  5. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    Why?

    No. Try numquam regrediaris numquam cedas

    Nothing

    Don't be in a hurry to tattoo something incorrect. Wait for someone to comment on this translation before you use it.
  6. IBBO New Member

    Thanks for your response

    Can i ask what this reads to you then please:

    Nunquam Regressus Nunquam Trado

    Regards

    Phil
  7. IBBO New Member

    bitmap, sorry probably stupid question but what is an imperative?

    Regards

    Phil
  8. IBBO New Member

    Hi,

    Sorry not that i am questioning your translation, i appreciate your help but the followwing:

    Try numquam regrediaris numquam cedas

    Is coming up as never rule never withdraw?

    Regards

    Phil
  9. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    An imperative is a command.

    It is incomplete, but something like, Never having withdrawn, I never hand over

    See here for the accuracy of internet translators.
  10. IBBO New Member

    Hi Cinefactus,

    Can i ask how Nunquam Regressus Nunquam Trado reads in latin then?

    Regards

    Phil
  11. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    It is incomplete, but something like, Never having withdrawn, I never hand ??? over
  12. IBBO New Member

    Sorry just seen that. I like parts of both phrases. Would it be possible to join the two together

    with: nunquam regrediaris nunquam trado?

    Phil
  13. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    No. It is incorrect.
  14. IBBO New Member

    Thanks for your help

    Hard to know who to trust, so many different answers when it comes to latin it would appear.

    So if i were to use the following on a logo:

    Nunquam Regressus Nunquam Trado

    it would round about be saying: Never having withdrawn, I never hand over

    The last part sounds good, just the first part suggests past tense. I want it be i will never retreat, i will never handover.

    Does that make sense sorry?
  15. IBBO New Member

    Hi Can somebody advise as to the best word for Retreat in Latin

    As in current tense not past. I will never

    Last question sorry
  16. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Saxonia
    It's more like saying "I'm using an outright stupid translation that an internet translator gave me when I actually got proper advice from a person who really knows Latin"
  17. scrabulista Consul

    • Consul
    Location:
    Tennessee
    IBBO,

    An imperative is a command. Trado is first person singular "I". regressus is a past participle of a deponent verb -- the 2nd person singular imperative form "you, thou" of this verb is regrediaris.

    So your Nunquam regrediaris nunquam trado is "Never retreat, I never hand over."
    You would be telling another person to not retreat, then saying that you won't hand over.

    Instead of choosing a phrase based on its sound or appearance, could you clarify exactly who is supposed to not surrender (or hand over), and who is supposed to not retreat?
  18. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    Trado is also a transitive verb. You need something to hand over, and it has to be to somebody/thing.
  19. Imprecator Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Colchis
    Implied se, I figure. I'd make it explicit, though
  20. new to this New Member

    If you are going for literal translation you will not get it....I think you are going after a military motto style saying. If so the implication is battle and war....that you are strong and fight to the end. That you will never be captured. The closest thing I would suggest is.....

    Bello, ego numquam recedet, numquam capi me inimicus meus.

    or


    Bello, ego numquam recede. Numquam capi me inimicus meus.

    It basically states "War, I will never withdraw. Never to be taken by my enemy".

    The first one is more a continuing sentence...."War, I will never recede from it, never to be taken by my enemy.

    I think this is what you are getting at........please make sure someone else vettes this translation and implied meaning before you do anything with it.

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