1. Anonymous Guest

    Hello we are 3 people in the process of setting up a new Geolocigal & Environmental scanning company. We are currently looking for a name for our new company and because we love the latin language, we would love to use the language in the company title. As it is a new beginning (fresh start) and there are three of us there, I would like to get the latin translations for the following words:

    New Beginning
    Fresh Start
    Three people
    New Venture

    I would greatly appreciate your input also as it is suprisingly difficult to come up with a name which all three of us can agree on.

    Thanks again,
    Susan.
  2. Andy Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Urbs Panamae
    My takes: (btw. Novus works well as new -and- fresh)

    New Beginning - Novus Coeptus (New Beginning, Undertaking) (Can be also Novum Coeptum, which is neutral)

    Fresh Start - Pretty much the same as the last.

    Three people - Tres Homines (Three Human Beings)

    New Venture - (Once more, I think Coeptus suits the purpose quite well.)

    compare Annuit Coeptis (lit. He/She/It gives favor to our undertakings)
  3. kmp Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    England
    You could also try :

    Nova coepta (or Coepta nova) - new ventures

    Nova initia - new beginnings

    Tres personae - 3 characters / personalities

    (word order is not important in any of these and note that coepta means things undertaken or begun so you can use it for ventures or beginnings)

    On a Latin grammar point - Andy, are you sure about novus coeptus?

    My dictionary has

    coeptus - us m. - a begining (rare and only in plural)

    so I think you might have to say novi coeptus - new beginnings. You can't have novus coeptus - a new beginning in the singular

    For that, you'd have to use the alternative form you suggested:

    novum coeptum
  4. Andy Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Urbs Panamae
    Hmm... could be. Cicero uses coeptus, but since it has no modifiers, I can't really tell if it is in the singular or plural.

    So, yeah, I'll go with your correction.

    Novi coeptus.

    Thanks!
  5. kmp Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    England
    Andy, I don't think we can say with certainty that novus coeptus would be wrong, It's just that coeptus is rare and we only have very few examples. And the examples we have are in the plural,

    So it's safer to either always use the plural or use coeptum instead which is common and straightforward.
  6. Anonymous Guest

    NEW BEGINNING

    HELLO I DONT KNOW IF ANYONE CAN HELP ME. I HAVE BEEN SERIOUSLY ILL OVER THE LAST 3 YEARS BUT HAVE NOW FINISHED ALL MY TREATMENT AND WISH TO GET A TATOO TO MARK THIS.

    IM LOOKING FOR A LATIN PHASE OR QUOTE THAT MEANS 'NEW BEGINNING' OR 'NEW START' OR SOMETHING SIMILAR. I HAVE BEEN SEARCHING FOR SOMETIME NOW SO ANY HELP WOULD BE APPRECIATED.

    THANK U IN ADVANCE.
    SARAH
  7. Marius Magnus Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    California
    You don't have to yell.
  8. Andy Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Urbs Panamae
    :)

    How about Novi Coeptus, which means lit. New beginnings or new undertakings.
  9. Anonymous Guest

    Too new begginings

    hi could any one PLEASE help me, im moveing away very soon and wanted the the phrase " too new begginings" in latin on my arm..... i think in latin it is "dendegera".

    be brilliant if you could translate for me.
  10. Anonymous Guest

    Does any body please no what the Latin translation of “New Beginnings” is. I think its Dendegera. Would be a great help if someone could give me the correct translation
  11. Ioannes New Member

    Location:
    Zagrabiae, Croatia
    Maybe:

    Ad initia nova.
  12. Iynx Consularis

    • Consularis
    Initia nova might well do for "new beginnings".

    "Dendegera", if it is a Latin word, is strange to me; neither do I find it in Glare, Lewis-&-Short, Niermeyer, DuCange, or Whittaker (well-known dictionaries). May I ask where you found it?
  13. QMF Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Virginia, US
    Wait, "two new beginnings" or "to new beginnings"? It's certainly not "too new beginnings", as that makes no sense.

    If it is the latter, I think Ioannes' suggestion is fine. If it is the former, replace "ad" with "dua."

    Your proposal, I am fairly certain, is not a word.

    May I also ask why you made more or less duplicate threads?
  14. scrabulista Praetor

    • Praetor
    Location:
    Tennessee
    initia nimium nova?
  15. Imber Ranae Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    I think just nova initia for "new beginnings" and nova coepta for "new ventures" is fine.

    You don't necessarily need modifiers to determine an ambiguous form. If, as I suspect, you are referring to this passage in Cicero's de Finibus (Atque ipsa hominis institutio si loqueretur hoc diceret, primos suos quasi coeptus appetendi fuisse ut se conservaret in ea natura in qua ortus esset) the word coeptus can only be accusative plural as it is in indirect discourse, meaning the singular would have to be coeptum.

    I doubt danofstella77 really meant to write "too".

Share This Page

 

Our Latin forum is a community for discussion of all topics relating to Latin language, ancient and medieval world.

Latin Boards on this Forum:

English to Latin, Latin to English translation, general Latin language, Latin grammar, Latine loquere, ancient and medieval world links.