Nostra aetate pauca manu parantur.

By Hadassah Branch, in 'Latin to English Translation', Apr 10, 2019.

  1. This sentence is from Wheelock's Latin. Stuck on it for half a day. Can you guys kindly translate this?

    Nostra aetate pauca manu parantur.
  2. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena
    Translate it step by step:

    pauca parantur. (pauca = paucas paucae res)

    pauca parantur manu. (I'm changing the word order to show you that pauca and manu do not belong together)

    And then just add the temporal reference 'nostra aetate'.
    Last edited by Bitmap, Apr 10, 2019
  3. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Paucae res, in this context (pauca is nominative here).
    Bitmap likes this.
  4. So, how would you use paucus in the nominative singular? What would it roughly translate to?
  5. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Paucus in the singular translates to "little (in quantity)", but it's rare. It's mostly found in the plural, meaning "few".

    Pauca here is neuter plural nominative: "few things".
  6. Wow, thanks! I kept on thinking few men. This wasn't introduced in the book but hey, it's great we have fora to fill the gaps textbooks often create.
  7. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    That would have been in the masculine, pauci.
  8. Bitmap Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Cygnea, Gena

    Thank you! Wrote that in a rush again. Sorry for the confusion, Hadassah.

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