omnis qui se exaltat humiliabitur

By Cinefactus, in 'General Latin Chat (English)', May 19, 2017.

  1. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    As the spoken Latin course rapidly approaches, and not having done any English to Latin exercises in over a decade, I am feeling decidedly unprepared.

    If anyone would be happy to give me some practice, I would be very grateful.

    I figure I would rather be humiliated here than in person ;)
  2. Ignis Umbra Ignis Aeternus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    USA
    I may not always be active, but I'll do what I can. :)

    Give this short silly introduction I made up a go:

    Hi! My name is George, and I'll be your instructor for the next five weeks. You'll find all of my rules for our little meetings in this book. There aren't many, but I still want you to keep it so you'll remember them.
  3. rothbard Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    London
    How about this passage adapted from a book I am working with, Vincent & Mountford's Outline of Latin Prose Composition:

    "Catiline had already collected a band of conspirators both in Rome and in Italy. One day at daybreak Cicero was nearly murdered at home by two Roman knights. On the same day he summoned the senate to the temple of Juppiter and delivered a long speech against Catiline. In anger Catline left the senate and set out for the camp of Manlius at Faesulae. After a short time five conspirartors were arrested in Rome, and within a few days were condemned to death. At the beginning of the next month Catiline himself was defeated."

    Hints from the book:

    summon, convoco (1).
    deliver: here use habeo (2).
    in anger, iratus, adj.
    Last edited by rothbard, May 19, 2017
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Let's do one thing at a time, though. :p
  5. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    Let me have a quick crack at the first one...

    salve, nomen mihi est Georgius praeceptor quoque tuus per hebdomades quinque secundas ero. omnes regulae quae ad coitiones nostras pertinent in hoc libello inveniuntur. etsi non multae, hunc tamen te servare volo ut illas memineris
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Overall good.

    That use of quoque sounds a bit unusual to me.

    Proximas would seem better to me than secundas.

    I think conventus would be more common for "meetings" than coitiones. For the "little" nuance, conventicula, maybe? It's a relatively rare word, so I'm not sure, but perhaps it would work. If not, I suppose you can still say parvulos conventus.

    I'd use the future invenientur.
    Cinefactus likes this.
  7. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    Thanks Pacifica. I was tossing up as to what would be the best word to use for the first and. I thought et looked a bit strange. What would you suggest?
  8. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    -que would ring well to my ear, but maybe a simple et is OK too.
    Cinefactus likes this.
  9. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    Fingers crossed for the second one ;)

    Catilina iam et Romae et in Italia manum coniuratorum convenerat. quodam die prima luce, Cicero domi ab equitibus romanis paene necatus, ipso quoque die senatu ad templum Iovis convocato, longam in Catilinam fecit orationem. iratus, Catilina senatu discesso, ad castras Manlii Faesulas profectus est. coniurati Romae brevi praehensi et post paucos dies morte damnati sunt. principio vero mensis sequentis Catilina ipse victus est.
  10. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Not the right verb. Convenire means, when transitive, "to meet (someone)", or, when intransitive, "to assemble" instransitively, i.e. "to come together", not to "assemble (some people) together". "Had assembled" here could translate to coegerat, for example.
    You forgot to translate "two".
    Better: eodem die.
    Better habuit, I think, as suggested by Rothbard's book.
    Discedere is intransitive, you can't discedere senatum. You could say egressus e senatu, for example, or senatu relicto.

    Castra, it's neuter.

    You forgot to translate "five".
    That's a relatively common medieval misspelling, given the confusion between ae, oe, and e at the time, but the classical spelling has e, not ae.

    Also, in the original, "after a short time" is clearly in an emphatic position at the beginning of the sentence; it would be good to render that in translation.
  11. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    How about:
    Catilina iam et Romae et in Italia manum coniuratorum coegerat. quodam die prima luce Cicero domi a duobus equitibus romanis paene necatus eodem quoque die senatu ad templum Iovis convocato longam in Catilinam habuit orationem. iratus Catilina senatu reliquo ad castra Manlii Faesulas profectus est. brevi autem ex coniuratis quinque Romae sunt prehensi et post paucos dies morte damnati. principio vero mensis sequentis Catilina ipse victus est.
  12. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Remove quoque.

    *relicto

    Also, actually I imagine the senate would meet inside the temple rather than near it, so if that is the case you need in templum.
    Cinefactus likes this.
  13. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    Thanks again :) I initially used in, but then I wanted to avoid having two ins in the same sentence. Serves me right ;)

    For quoque, I was looking for some way to link the two sentences together. Could I just run them on do you think?
  14. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    The way you've constructed it, it wouldn't be a run-on:
    quodam die prima luce Cicero domi a duobus equitibus romanis paene necatus eodem die senatu in templo Iovis convocato longam in Catilinam habuit orationem.

    One day, at dawn, Cicero, having nearly been killed by two Roman horsemen, on the same day, with the senate called together in the temple of Jupiter, gave a long speech against Catiline.
    There's only one subject (Cicero) and one main verb (habuit), so it's fine.
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  15. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Yes, you've got only one sentence there, Cinefactus.

    But even if you had two sentences, there would be nothing wrong in starting the second with just eodem die.

    If you really wanted to add there something meaning "also", you would say etiam rather than quoque (but that is unnecessary). Eodem quoque die looks like it's implying "(on some other day and) also on the same day", which is weird.
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  16. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Here's a new sentence to translate:

    Yesterday, as we were having dinner at my brother's, Publius told me he would take revenge on you guys for letting your dogs shit all over his garden, but I don't think he will.
  17. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    Can't say I have ever translated something quite like that!

    heri, dum apud fratrem cenabamus, Publius me dixit se ultionem vobis petiturum esse cum canes vestros ubique in horto suo cacare siveristis, ego tamen dubio
  18. rothbard Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    London
    I would use a cum clause at the beginning. Dico takes the dative of the person addressed. I think "to take revenge against someone" is ultionem petere ex aliquo. In the rest of the sentence, "siveristis" and "dubio" don't look right to me.
    Cinefactus likes this.
  19. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    Not quite sure what to do about the siveristis. What about:
    cum heri apud fratrem cenabamus, Publius mihi dixit se ultionem ex vobis petiturum esse cum canes vestros ubique in horto suo cacare siveristis, ego tamen censeo illum haud petiturum
  20. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    "dubito" would be fine. You just missed the t. Again, the problem with "siveristis" is just a formation thing.
    If you want to use a "cum" clause at the beginning, you should probably use the subjunctive.
    Cinefactus likes this.

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