"One raindrop raises the sea" &c

By Anonymous, in 'English to Latin Translation', Feb 11, 2007.

  1. Anonymous Guest

    Hello all...I've been trying in vain to translate a motto into Latin. In English it reads 'one raindrop raises the sea, but alone can never flood the kingdom'. The closest I have managed to get with my limited knowledge of the language is this: Unus secui facio superus profundum , tamen non redundo regnum. I suspect it is wholly incorrect.
    Could somebody help me out please? Thanks muchly!
  2. QMF Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Virginia, US
    To be honest I actually don't think Latin has a word or a phrase that can be used for raindrop...very odd.
    Edit: I stand corrected.
  3. Andy Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Urbs Panamae
    True, QMF! What a thing. This is how I try to get over that:

    Una mica aquae mare accrescere facit sed nunquam regnum inundare potest

    A particle of water causes the sea to grow yet it can never flood the kingdom.
  4. Anonymous Guest

    thanks guys! much appreciated...
  5. Andy Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Urbs Panamae
    I would rather you wait for what other people have to say: I believe there'll be many interesting takes on 'raindrop'.
  6. Iynx Consularis

    • Consularis
    How about:

    Gutta imbrium solum maria elevet, sed numquam regnum inundabit.

    I have seen gutta imbrium for "raindrop"; but I made up the rest. Is this a request for a translation, or is the original poster seeking an actual quotation, with source? If so, I'm afraid I can't help.

    But I like the saying. It reminds me of Woody Allen: "The race is not always to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, but that's the way to bet."
  7. QMF Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Virginia, US
    Ah, I like how solus feels here better than unus. Unus is more literal but the "one" is probably more fittingly phrased as "a single".
  8. Iynx Consularis

    • Consularis
    That was intended as solum the adverb, not solus, -a, -um; gutta is feminine, of course.
  9. QMF Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Virginia, US
    Well the general effect is the same.

Share This Page

 

Our Latin forum is a community for discussion of all topics relating to Latin language, ancient and medieval world.

Latin Boards on this Forum:

English to Latin, Latin to English translation, general Latin language, Latin grammar, Latine loquere, ancient and medieval world links.