Orpheus poeta feras etiam cantu suo domabat atque magna saxa lyrae suavitate movebat.

By SpeedPocok5, in 'Latin Beginners', Jan 13, 2019.

  1. SpeedPocok5 Member

    Orpheus poeta feras etiam cantu suo domabat atque magna saxa lyrae suavitate movebat.


    is it normal that in this sentence the "magna saxa lyrae" goes with no "et"?
  2. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Atque means the same as et.
    SpeedPocok5 likes this.
  3. SpeedPocok5 Member

    but it's not the same "et" I mean, between saxa and lyrae I think that needs an "et".
  4. Etaoin Shrdlu Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Are you thinking that lyrae is a direct object parallel with magna saxa? It isn't. The ending should tell you that.
    SpeedPocok5 likes this.
  5. SpeedPocok5 Member

    I don't get what it could mean, so the first part, I understand it, but the second one:
    "atque magna saxa lyrae suavitate movebat".

    something like that: "and moves the big stones and the lyres sweetly".
  6. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    No, "and he moved big stones with the sweetness of the lyre".

    suavitas is a noun, not an adverb.
    SpeedPocok5 likes this.

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