Pathetic Mistranslations

By Cinefactus, in 'General Latin Chat (English)', Mar 1, 2013.

  1. Laurentius Weebus Maximus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    I don't remember any of those quotes in our dub. o_O Lucky.
  2. Aurifex Aedilis

    • Aedilis
    Location:
    England
    Bona Dea certainly was said though.
    malleolus likes this.
  3. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
  4. RobertusSitiens Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Sterling, VA USA
    The show "The Walking Dead" (which I love) just unveiled a badge which reads "ERO RESURGAM", and show reps officially report it to say "We will rise again", which of course should be "RESURGEMUS". The sad thing is that in the context of the show, I would have bought "I will be. I will rise again." Maybe they just shouldn't have told us what the intended translation was.
  5. Laurentius Weebus Maximus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    To me it sounds more like "I'll rise again for my master."
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Lol. And who's the master of the living dead? The Devil? :devilsmile:

    Personally, upon first reading it, I thought it was a typo for ego resurgam.
    RobertusSitiens likes this.
  7. Laurentius Weebus Maximus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    Lol, I don't know, why the devil? :D
  8. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    What, would it be Jesus? It could make sense after all, since he both brought dead people back to life and himself rose again...
    Last edited by Pacis puella, Mar 4, 2015
  9. Laurentius Weebus Maximus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    Some atheists infact say that we Christians adore a zombie. But I think zombies are more about the voodoo religion, not sure. :confused:
  10. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Initially, yes, the term comes from voodoo. Though here they mention another possible origin, but until now I'd always heard voodoo.
  11. Laurentius Weebus Maximus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Antium
    Oh I didn't know the creole one too.
  12. RobertusSitiens Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Sterling, VA USA
    I like that! It doesn't fit the context, but it makes sense and is amusing to interject in to the show :)
    Laurentius likes this.
  13. alexios New Member

  14. RobertusSitiens Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Sterling, VA USA
    I had also considered that maybe someone found this thread while googling and misunderstood the structure.
    Aurifex likes this.
  15. Aurifex Aedilis

    • Aedilis
    Location:
    England
  16. Matthaeus Vemortuicida strenuus

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Varsovia
    It could be a voodoo priest/priestess.
  17. Stultus Jacobus Member

    In the new Mad Max movie one of the main character's names is a lady named Imperator Furiosa. This bothered me a lot more than it rightfully should.
    Pacis puella likes this.
  18. Aurifex Aedilis

    • Aedilis
    Location:
    England
    Maybe the character in question is intentionally of ambiguous gender. I wouldn't know.
    Stultus Jacobus likes this.
  19. Stultus Jacobus Member

    Well she's very clearly a woman. Everyone calls her "she" and "her." I didn't know this could be done intentionally, I dont recall having seen something like this before, I just thought it was Latin gibberish.
  20. Aurifex Aedilis

    • Aedilis
    Location:
    England
    I think most people would agree that in Latin it can't; I was looking for some justification, however slight, for the masculine noun with a feminine adjective; gender ambiguity might be regarded as one justification for it.
    But there's potentially another reason. In French, for example, we encounter phrases such as la directeur artistique or madame la directeur, where directrice would ordinarily be expected. It's a way of challenging potentially divisive gender distinctions in job titles. Referring to a woman not as an imperatrix but as an imperator could be regarded as the same kind of thing.
    RobertusSitiens and Callaina like this.

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