Pro Caelio, section 26 - is this a result clause?

By Phoebus Apollo, in 'Reading Latin', Sep 13, 2017.

  1. Phoebus Apollo Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Fera quaedam sodalitas et plane pastoricia atque agrestis germanorum Lupercorum, quorum coitio illa silvestris ante est instituta quam humanitas atque leges, si quidem non modo nominadeferunt inter se sodales sed etiam commemorant sodalitatem in accusando, ut ne quis id forte nesciat timere videantur!


    It's the only explanation I can come up with to explain the 'ut + subj' clause - even though there's no word like tam, talis etc - but I'm not sure if it's right. If it helps, my translation is:
    ...if indeed its members (sodales) not only accuse/prosecute one another, but even, in their accusation/in the course of their prosecution, they speak of/mention their companionship/brotherhood, so that/with the result that they seem to fear that any one should not know of it.


    Update: a commentary I read said 'si quidem' is 'causal' - this probably explains it, but I'm still a bit unclear...does that mean it's a purpose clause??
    Thanks in advance!
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Don't mix things up. The si quidem clause and the ut clause are two different clauses.

    The ut clause is a result clause.

    The si quidem clause is a causal clause (meaning "given that..." or the like).
    Phoebus Apollo likes this.
  3. Phoebus Apollo Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Thanks very much!
    You know how result clauses have 'signifying' words before the ut to show they're result clauses (like 'tam') - does the non modo...sed etiam have the same force here?
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    No.
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  5. Phoebus Apollo Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Okay, thank you :)
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    Result clauses don't always have words like tam etc. preceding them. Sometimes, like here, they're just on their own.
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  7. Phoebus Apollo Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Ah okay, I didn't know that - so thanks!
  8. Dantius Homo Sapiens

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    in orbe lacteo
    Results clauses are almost always taught as having a signifying word like "tam". In fact, I've often been told that you can recognize whether an ut clause is a result clause based on whether there's a signifying word like "tam". That often seems to result (no pun intended) in people being confused when they first encounter a result clause that doesn't have such a signifying word.
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