1. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    What is the difference between the pronunciation renum and rhenum?
  2. Hemo Rusticus The Lizard King

    • Civis Illustris
    Words beginning in 'rho' that in Proto-Greek were preceded by either the sibilant (*srewo 'I flow') or the semi-vowel (*wregjo 'I do', cf. Eng 'work') became aspirated in Ionic, following the general pattern of /s/ and /w/ > /h/. This was generalized to all initial 'rho's.

    I have only consulted Dawes, Sihler, and something translated from German I don't have with me, but they seem to agree that the pronunciation was essentially voiceless, as demonstrated here. Whether the Romans were conscious of it/tried to imitate it in orthography, I have no idea.
    Last edited by Hemo Rusticus, Jul 1, 2018
  3. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    Alas I don't speak any of those languages ;)
  4. Hemo Rusticus The Lizard King

    • Civis Illustris
    I mean were you asking in the context of Latin? 'Cause Godmy or Ser probably knows more.
  5. Hemo Rusticus The Lizard King

    • Civis Illustris
    To be fair, nobody speaks Latin and Ancient Greek. :chicken:
  6. Cinefactus Censor

    • Censor
    Location:
    litore aureo
    Yes, I am just reading a bit of Caesar and wondering how to pronounce Rhenum. I was hoping it might be something like the French r...
  7. Imperfacundus Reprobatissimus

    • Civis Illustris
    In practice it's unlikely that a typical Roman would've bothered to make that sound in Rhenus instead of their native /r/.
    Godmy and Hemo Rusticus like this.
  8. Mafalda Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Paulopolis
    Here it sounds like kind of hR. There are subtitles in Latin as well, you can switch the language of the subtitles in Settings.
    Cinefactus likes this.
  9. Godmy A Monkey

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Bohemia
    Well, if one adds a true voiceless glottal fricative, the result [by assimilation] is pretty much having a voiceless trill on the beginning.

    But indeed that seems as a better solution than to voice both "r" and "h" (although in Latin you may expect whatever, since the upper class Romans, if they bothered at all, could have said it almost arbitrarily, with a mixed phonology).

Share This Page

 

Our Latin forum is a community for discussion of all topics relating to Latin language, ancient and medieval world.

Latin Boards on this Forum:

English to Latin, Latin to English translation, general Latin language, Latin grammar, Latine loquere, ancient and medieval world links.