Relief From = Levatio + Dat/Abl?

By Gregorius, in 'Latin Grammar Questions', Jul 16, 2017.

  1. Gregorius Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    I'm working on an English-to-Latin verse translation, and I've encountered a bit of a conundrum in this rhyming triplet.

    Cuique strenuō
    Levātiō
    Invenitur in cibō,

    What I'm trying to say is, "For (or from) each/every strenuous thing, relief will be found in food." The problem is I don't know if "
    levātiō" calls for the thing being mitigated to be in the dative or ablative. Would it be better if the first word were "quōque"?
  2. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    What you've written means "For every strenuous man, relief will be found in food."

    You can use either the genitive or the dative (though perhaps the former would be more common), but it is rather desirable to use the word res, to make it clear you're talking about a thing. I realize it will no longer rhyme, though; but speaking of rhyming, cibo doesn't perfectly rhyme with strenuo and levatio because in theory a rhyme should start in a stressed syllable, and cibo is stressed on the first.

    I'm also not quite sure strenuus is the right word to use. What do you mean by "strenuous thing"? If you mean a difficult thing, I'm not sure strenuus can have that meaning. At any rate I don't think I've ever seen it used with that meaning and my dictionaries don't say it can be.

    Note also that forms of quisque rarely come first in a clause.
  3. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    I think medieval Latin poets tend to fudge that quite a bit more.
  4. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    I don't know; possibly, I guess, but most of what I've seen has seemed to stick to the rule.
  5. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    He could say labori cuique strenuo or such. Of course there's still the issue with strenuo in the first place.
  6. Pacifica grammaticissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Belgium
    With labori, strenuo seems to work rather well. Providing that was the idea he wanted to convey.
  7. Callaina Feles Curiosissima

    • Civis Illustris
    Location:
    Canada
    And maybe carnario = "in the larder", LOL. :D
  8. Gregorius Civis Illustris

    • Civis Illustris
    Multas gratias vobis ago! I know basically how Latin stress works, but this text is actually meant to be put to music. So since the melody will inevitably impose its own stress pattern (and stress by itself makes no real difference in meaning), I usually don't concern myself with maintaining canonical stress. As long as the number of syllables in each line is right and the rhyming syllables in the original version at least have the same vowels in the Latin rendition, I'm happy.

    The new triplet reads:

    Est in cibō
    Levātiō
    Cuique adhūc vexātō;

    I would re-translate it as "In food there is relief for every hitherto troubled person." It never ceases to be interesting how creative one has to be when translating song lyrics. That balance between fitting the original meter/rhyme and conveying the original meaning is a very delicate one to find. The titular line is actually "Be our guest," which I've paraphrased as "with the greatest hospitality" (hence the Latin title "Maxim Hospiti").

    Just to put the bit that I originally asked about in context, here's a sneak peak of the entire stanza.

    Et iocīs
    Et technīs
    Tē dēlectābimus sīc.
    Ēlegantia nostra haud dubitanda'st.
    Ad cēnam grātuītē
    Vocāta es. Gaudē!
    Est in cibō
    Levātiō
    Cuique adhūc vexātō;
    Optimō,
    Maximō
    Hospitiō!

    Original English:

    We tell jokes,
    I do tricks
    With my fellow candlesticks,
    And it's all in perfect taste. That you can bet!
    Go on and lift your glass.
    You've won your own free pass
    To be our guest.
    If you're stressed,
    It's fine dining we suggest.
    Be our guest,
    Be our guest,
    Be our guest!
    Last edited by Gregorius, Jul 16, 2017
    Callaina likes this.

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